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Last year’s outbreak of West Nile virus (WNV) sent residents and officials throughout the Dallas-Fort Worth area scrambling for information and resources to help stop the spread of West Nile virus, which left 89 Texans dead in 2012.

WNV is a mosquito-borne illness that causes flu-like symptoms to occur in infected patients. Though there is no vaccine against WNV, the general prognosis of patients with WNV is typically very good, as only about 1 percent of West Nile cases are severe. According to studies, up to 80 percent of humans infected by WNV see no symptoms, causing a large number of cases to go unreported. However, with summer making its way to North Texas, it’s important to know the signs and symptoms of WNV and when to seek medical or emergency attention.

Symptoms of WNV are often described as flu-like and can include:

  • Fever
  • Headaches
  • Muscle aches and pains
  • Fatigue
  • Lack of appetite
  • Excessive sweating
  • Weakness
  • Nausea and/or vomiting
  • Rash

These symptoms may appear within one day and up to two weeks from the date of infection by mosquito bite. If a mosquito has bitten you and any symptoms of WNV are present, contact your doctor. Young children, elderly people and those with compromised immune systems or pre-existing medical conditions should monitor any symptoms closely and consult a physician immediately if WNV is suspected.

Though the prognosis for the vast majority of WNV cases is good, the virus can lead to West Nile neuroinvasive disease (WNND), a neurological disease affecting the central nervous system. WNND can result in meningitis, encephalitis, meningoencephalitis and poliomyelitis. In addition to the standard symptoms of WNV, people with WNND may experience a stiff neck, altered mental status and acute paralysis. If any of these symptoms are present, the patient should seek immediate medical attention.

If you experience emergency symptoms or suspect you have West Nile virus, head to Highland Park Emergency Center at 5150 Lemmon Ave. Suite 108, a free-standing emergency room right in your neighborhood. Highland Park Emergency Center is open 24-hours a day — the only no-wait emergency room around. An emergency room physician can see you quickly, evaluate your condition, and take steps to alleviate your symptoms immediately. 

Highland Park Emergency Center

5150 Lemmon Ave. Suite 108
Dallas, Texas 75209

214-396-4550
highlandparker.com

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If you or your child suffers from asthma, an attack can be a sudden, scary occurrence, even when preparations are made in case of an attack.

Asthma is a chronic lung disease affecting the airways. The disease causes airways to become inflamed and to narrow during an attack, which can lead to symptoms including wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing and tightness in the chest.

Asthma can be attributed to both genetic and environmental factors and affects people of all ages, with symptoms often beginning in childhood. There is no known cure for asthma, but symptoms can be managed successfully by creating an asthma action plan with your doctor that includes daily medication, “rescue” treatments and tracking all symptoms you experience.

An asthma attack may come on out of the blue, but attacks can be brought on by a variety of factors. Triggers for asthma symptoms can include allergens such as dust or pollen, irritants like smoke or aerosol sprays, physical activity, and some medicines or drugs.

When symptoms occur, it’s important to begin treatment right away. If treatment is delayed, symptoms can become severe enough to require emergency attention or even cause death in extreme cases. Even if emergency care is needed, if asthma symptoms are caught early during an attack, hospital admission can be often prevented.

Asthma symptoms can be complicated by conditions like pneumonia or a cold, so if you or a loved one experiences asthma symptoms while suffering one of these or similar conditions, seek treatment immediately.

If you see or experience emergency symptoms, head to Highland Park Emergency Center at 5150 Lemmon Ave. Suite 108, a free-standing emergency room right in your neighborhood. Highland Park Emergency Center is open 24-hours a day — the only no-wait emergency room around.  An emergency room physician can see you quickly, evaluate your condition, and take steps to alleviate your symptoms immediately. If appropriate, they will admit you to the hospital if needed.

Highland Park Emergency Center

5150 Lemmon Ave. Suite 108
Dallas, Texas 75209

214-396-4550
highlandparker.com

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After work, you’re in the kitchen preparing dinner for your family. While chopping vegetables, the knife slips and you cut your finger. What should you do now? Does the cut require stitches?

We’re often inclined to try and treat injuries at home, but many times, emergency care is necessary for injuries that may seem less serious than they actually are.

Some of the most common injuries seen in the emergency room include:

  • Ankle, foot, hand and wrist injuries
  • Head injuries
  • Knee injuries
  • Lacerations
  • Injuries sustained in motor vehicle accidents

Though not every case of an injury listed above requires a trip to the ER, there are signs and symptoms for each that mean emergency treatment should be obtained.

Ankle, Foot, Hand and Wrist Injuries
If you've injured your ankle, foot, hand or wrist, it’s important to determine whether the injury is a sprain or fracture.

Severe pain, swelling and bruising are shared symptoms between sprains and fractures, so if there is any possibility that you have a fracture, seek out a doctor as soon as possible. Delayed or improper treatment of fractures can lead to long-term issues like repeat injuries, arthritis and weakness. 

Head Injuries
Head injuries are serious and can be extremely dangerous if not treated properly. A traumatic brain injury (TBI), like a concussion, contusion or hematoma, can be caused by a sports-related hit, a fall or any occurrence where an injury to the head is caused by trauma.

Symptoms of a TBI, often a concussion, include: confusion, dizziness, headache, memory loss, fuzzy vision, sensitivity to light or noise, a sluggish or tired feeling or a clear or bloody fluid from the nose, or ears or mouth. If you experience any of these symptoms after a head injury it is extremely important to seek immediate medical care. 

Knee Injuries
Knee injuries can be caused by a wide range of activities in daily life, including sports, falls and exercise. Often, sore knees can be treated at home, but seek emergency treatment for any of the following signs: obvious deformity in the knee or leg; inability to bear weight on the leg; extreme pain; or immediate swelling, numbness or tingling below the knee.

Lacerations
It can be hard to determine whether or not a laceration needs stitches or emergency care, as many injuries can be treated at home with bandages and home remedies. However, be sure to seek emergency treatment if the cut is deep or at a joint, the cut is bleeding severely or blood is spurting, you cannot get the cut clean, the laceration is from an animal bite, or if bleeding can’t be stopped within 10 minutes while firm and steady pressure is applied.

Injuries Sustained in Motor Vehicle Accidents
All of the previously listed injuries can occur as the result of a motor vehicle accident, including sprains, fractures, TBIs and lacerations. If you’re injured in a motor vehicle accident, watch your injuries closely for signs that emergency treatment is necessary.

If you are injured and require emergency care, head to Highland Park Emergency Center, a free-standing emergency room right in your neighborhood. They have the equipment and doctors to take X-rays and other tests like a hospital emergency room, but are less crowded and much faster than a traditional emergency room so you can get home sooner. Highland Park Emergency Room is open 24-hours a day and has admitting privileges with nearby hospitals if the injury requires a longer stay.

Highland Park Emergency Center is located at 5150 Lemmon Ave., Suite 108, in Dallas. You can also call the emergency center at 214-443-8131. No appointments are necessary.

Highland Park Emergency Center
214-443-8131

5150 Lemmon Ave Suite 108
Dallas, Texas 75209

highlandparker.com

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A sore throat can be a symptom of a number of illnesses — both viral and bacterial. To ensure proper treatment is given, it’s important to diagnose what the cause of the sore throat may be.

There are many throat infections that require antibiotics — strep throat being one. Strep throat (streptococcal pharyngitis) is a contagious infection, which research has shown to cause 37 percent of sore throats in children and between 5 and 15 percent of sore throats in adults.

Common symptoms of strep throat include:

  • Fever
  • Red sore throat, possibly with white patches
  • Chills
  • Enlarged lymph nodes
  • Pain when swallowing
  • General ill feeling
  • Headache

Strep throat is contagious by close contact and is often spread through sharing drinks or utensils, kissing, or coughing into your hand and touching doorknobs or shaking hands. Symptoms often begin within two to five days of contact with the strep germ.

If strep throat is suspected, most health care providers can perform a rapid strep test. However, there is a chance that even if you have strep, the test can still be negative. If the test is positive, antibiotics should be prescribed, as they are necessary to speed up the recovery process and lower the risk of spreading infection. In certain patients, a short course of steroids can significantly improve their condition, especially pain.

If strep isn't the case, a sore throat could be caused by a peritonsillar abscess, which occurs when one or both tonsils become infected by bacteria. Symptoms of a peritonsillar abscess are similar to strep throat and include: chills, difficulty swallowing, fever, headache, tender glands of the jaw and throat, and severe sore throat that is usually on one side.

If the infection is caught early, antibiotics may treat the condition, however, if a peritonsillar abscess is diagnosed, the abscess will need to be drained.

Another illness to be aware of when experiencing a sore throat is mononucleosis. Because the symptoms of mononucleosis, or mono, are similar to strep, the two diseases are often confused. Symptoms can include:

  • Drowsiness
  • Sore throat
  • Fever
  • General discomfort
  • Loss of appetite
  • Muscle aches
  • Swollen spleen 

Mono and strep have a different goal for treatment; treatment for mono is usually aimed to provide symptom relief, while strep treatment is designed to quicken recovery and prevent the illness from spreading.

If you have symptoms of strep throat or are being treated for strep but are not feeling better within 24 to 48 hours, go to Highland Park Emergency Center at 5150 Lemmon Ave. Suite 108, a free-standing emergency room right in your neighborhood that is open 24-hours a day — the only no-wait emergency room around.  An emergency room physician can see you quickly, evaluate your condition, and take steps to alleviate your symptoms immediately. If appropriate, they will admit you to the hospital if needed.

Highland Park Emergency Center
214-396-4550

5150 Lemmon Ave. Suite 108
Dallas, Texas 75209

http://highlandparker.com

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Winter months bring on a bevy of illnesses, and a cough is often a symptom. Sometimes, a cough may just be a minor seasonal annoyance, but when should a cough raise a concern?

It is important to note that a cough is only a symptom and not a disease, so determining additional symptoms is often the best way to form a treatment plan.

Typically, a cough is labeled as either productive or nonproductive. A productive cough produces phlegm or mucus, often from drainage from the throat or possibly from the lungs. Productive coughs can also be caused by viral illnesses, infections, chronic lung disease or smoking.

A nonproductive cough is described as dry or hacking. These coughs don’t produce mucus and can be caused by a variety of factors including viral illness, allergies, asthma and exposure to dust, fumes and chemicals in the work environment.

If you have a cough, evaluate additional symptoms to determine if they could be associated with a more serious ailment, as medical care may be necessary.

Influenza, commonly known as the flu, is often accompanied by a dry cough. The flu comes on quickly, usually with a high fever, aches and pains in joints and muscles, and general weakness throughout the body. A sore throat and nasal discharge may also appear. Most people who get the flu recover with over-the-counter remedies and without medical attention, but if you are very sick or worried about your illness, see a doctor immediately, as they can provide a prescription. Tamiflu is the only medication approved for the treatment of influenza and requires a prescription. Remember the old saying, “Mother a cold, but doctor a flu.”

Pneumonia, caused by an infection, is another concern that contains cough as a symptom. Symptoms of pneumonia initially resemble a cold and include sneezing, sore throat and cough, followed by a high fever and chills. If the infection moves to the air passages, a productive cough is usually a main symptom. People with pneumonia must be evaluated by a medical professional and antibiotics may be required. Many people who are affected with pneumonia can be treated at home with antibiotics, but hospitalization may be necessary.

Though a cough is usually thought to be a symptom of illness, coughing can be associated with severe complications such as pulmonary embolism and congestive heart failure.

Pulmonary embolism occurs when a major blood vessel in the lung is suddenly blocked, usually by a blood clot. Symptoms include a sudden shortness of breath, sharp chest pains that worsen during coughing or deep breathing, and a cough that results in pink, foamy mucus. If you have symptoms similar to these, see a doctor immediately.

Congestive heart failure (a weakened pumping ability in the heart) can be marked by both a productive cough and a nonproductive cough. Coughing can produce a wet, frothy sputum — possibly tinted pink with blood — or, may result in a dry, hacking cough with no mucus. Fatigue, shortness of breath and increased urination are also signs of congestive heart failure. If these symptoms are present, contact your care provider.

Though children afflicted with the flu or pneumonia are susceptible to coughing, a cough can mean different things for children. Croup, Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) infection and asthma are all common ailments affecting young children that are frequently accompanied by a cough.

A major symptom of croup in children is a “barking” cough, due to the swelling around vocal cords. Labored breathing and a worsening cough at night are also indicators of croup. In most cases, croup can be managed at home, but often, steroids are used by physicians to quicken recovery and relieve symptoms. 

Though it can affect people of any age, RSV is often seen in young children. In fact, most infants have had RSV by the age of 2. Symptoms include a cough, wheezing, labored breathing and fever. Mild RSV infections should go away without treatment, but severe infections may require hospitalization.

Asthma, a disorder caused by inflammation of the airways, can appear with a cough either with or without sputum, wheezing and shortness of breath. Emergency asthma symptoms are noted as a bluish color to lips and face, severe drowsiness or confusion and a rapid pulse. Asthma varies by case, so contact your physician to determine the best treatment plan.

Remember, a cough alone should not be the basis for diagnosis, but precaution should be taken when additional symptoms are present. Monitor all symptoms and abnormalities and keep a record to provide doctors if treatment is necessary.

If you see or experience emergency symptoms, head to Highland Park Emergency Center at 5150 Lemmon Ave. Suite 108, a free-standing emergency room right in your neighborhood that is open 24-hours a day — the only no-wait emergency room around.  An emergency room physician can see you quickly, evaluate your condition, and take steps to alleviate your symptoms immediately. If appropriate, they will admit you to the hospital if needed. 

Highland Park Emergency Center
214-396-4550

5150 Lemmon Ave. Suite 108
Dallas, Texas 75209

http://highlandparker.com

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Stomachaches are an uncomfortable part of life. Often, they can be prevented by refraining from certain foods, and treated with home remedies or over-the-counter medications.  But, what if your stomachache is something more serious than overindulgence? 

There is no simple solution for a stomachache, as it is not easily diagnosable. In fact, urgent care facilities typically don’t handle abdominal complaints for this reason. 

It is important to know that a stomachache could be the sign of a more serious condition, including: 

  • Appendicitis
  • Gall bladder
  • Pancreatitis
  • Diverticulitis
  • Kidney infections
  • Kidney stones
  • Female complications (ovarian or pregnancy-related)
  • Food poisoning 

Each of the listed conditions can be extremely dangerous if not treated effectively by a medical professional. Although most urgent care facilities will not handle abdominal complaints, Highland Park Emergency Center, a free-standing emergency room located on Lemmon near the Tollway, can diagnose your condition while providing definitive treatment and symptomatic relief.  They are also able to discern if your condition requires more extensive care, such as admission to the hospital or surgery, both which can be easily and quickly arranged. 

One of the more common abdominal complaints is food poisoning.  Sometimes, the illness alone doesn't require a doctor, but if you or a family member has food poisoning accompanied by persistent vomiting or diarrhea, dehydration is a serious complication to watch out for.  If emergency treatment is necessary, Highland Park Emergency Center can deliver significant relief from these symptoms, optimally deterring dehydration and stopping your vomiting. 

If you see or experience emergency symptoms, head to Highland Park Emergency Center, a free-standing emergency room right in your neighborhood that is open 24-hours a day—the only no-wait emergency room around.  An emergency room physician can see you quickly, evaluate your condition, and take steps to alleviate your symptoms immediately. If appropriate, they will admit you to the hospital if needed.

Highland Park Emergency Center
214-396-4550

5150 Lemmon Ave. Suite 108
Dallas, Texas 75209

http://highlandparker.com

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It’s cold and flu season again and everyone in the Park Cities seems to be blowing their noses and complaining. While a cold is unpleasant, influenza or “the flu” can be deadly to young children, the elderly and those with chronic or other underlying health conditions.

If you've not gotten your flu shot yet, get one immediately. It is your best defense against the flu, but takes two weeks to reach full effectiveness.

What if you get the flu? Remember the old phrase, “mother a cold, but doctor the flu.” While there is no treatment for a cold, the flu has a specific treatment plan that requires a prescription.

When taking care of your sick loved ones or yourself, be on the alert for danger signs. The flu can hit you hard and may require immediate medical attention. According to Highland Park Emergency Center, the following symptoms are signs of the flu:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Body aches
  • Headache
  • Chills
  • Fatigue
  • Sometimes diarrhea and vomiting

While not everyone who gets the flu has a fever, it is definitely a sign to pay closer attention.  Most people who get the flu recover with over-the-counter remedies and without medical attention, but if you are very sick or worried about your illness, you should seek help immediately.  People in a high risk group like young children, the elderly, pregnant women or those with underlying health problems should definitely get help.

Emergency warning signs include:

Children

  • Fast breathing or trouble breathing
  • Bluish skin color
  • Not drinking enough fluids
  • Not waking up or interacting with you
  • Extreme irritability, not wanting to be held
  • Symptoms improve but then return with fever and worse cough
  • Fever with a rash
  • Unable to eat (particularly babies)
  • No tears when crying
  • Fewer wet diapers (classic dehydration sign for babies and toddlers)

Adults

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen
  • Dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Severe or persistent vomiting
  • Flu-like symptoms that improve and then come back with fever and worse cough

The flu is highly contagious. For those who get sick, the Centers for Disease Control recommend you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone and without the use of drugs like Tylenol®. Do not go to work, school or anywhere in public until you are well.

If you see or experience emergency symptoms, head to Highland Park Emergency Center, a free-standing emergency room right in your neighborhood that is open 24-hours a day. An emergency room physician can see you quickly, evaluate your condition, and take steps to alleviate your symptoms immediately. If appropriate, they will prescribe anti-viral drugs and/or admit you to the hospital if needed.

Highland Park Emergency Center
214.396.4550

5150 Lemmon Ave Suite 108
Dallas, Texas 75209

http://highlandparker.com

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It’s not stickball in the street anymore. Kids’ sports today carry serious risks as they play longer and harder than we did at their age. Whether you are rooting for the Scots, the Raiders or the Panthers, now that school is back in session, parents need to be on the alert for signs of injury.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC), it is more serious than you might think. Your child has a 1 in 4 chance of being injured – most likely during practice rather than a game:

  • More than 3.5 million kids under age 14 receive medical treatment for sports injuries each year.
  • Among athletes ages 5 to 14, 28 percent of percent of football players, 25 percent of baseball players, 22 percent of soccer players, 15 percent of basketball players, and 12 percent of softball players were injured while playing their respective sports
  • Children ages 5 to 14 account for nearly 40 percent of all sports-related injuries treated in hospitals.
  • Overuse injuries are responsible for nearly half of all sports injuries to middle and high school students.
  • Although 62 percent of organized sports-related injuries occur during practice, one-third of parents do not have their children take the same safety precautions at practice that they would during a game.
  • Injuries associated with participation in sports and recreational activities account for 21 percent of all traumatic brain injuries among children in the United States.
  • Since 2000 there has been a fivefold increase in the number of serious shoulder and elbow injuries among youth baseball and softball players.

The good news is that more than half of all sports injuries in children are preventable. According to Highland Park Emergency Room, five simple steps can prevent many injuries today and in the future:

  1. Take Safety Precautions – at all times, not just during a game, make sure your child is wearing protective gear and interacting with equipment safely. Impress upon your child that most injuries occur during practice.
  2. Prepare – Don’t neglect stretching, warm-ups and drills that can help your body prepare to play.
  3. Hydrate – School has started, but summertime temperatures are still here. Make sure your child is drinking water, taking regular breaks to cool off and standing in the shade or going inside during breaks.
  4. Know Your Sport – The common injuries for football are obviously different than baseball. By understanding how your child might get hurt, you can take steps to prevent injuries. STOP Sports Injuries has helpful sports-specific injury prevention suggestions.
  5. Take Injuries Seriously – Today’s sprain or break can come back to hurt your child again in the future if not treated properly. That bad headache? It could be a concussion. Don’t risk it. Find out for sure. Be sure your child has healed before heading back out to the field.

Already have an injured child? An emergency center is ideal for most sports injuries. They have the equipment and doctors to take X-rays and other tests like a hospital emergency room, but are less crowded and much faster than a traditional emergency room so you can get your child home sooner. Highland Park Emergency Room is open 24/7 and has admitting privileges with nearby hospitals if the injury requires a longer stay.

The next time your child has a sports injury, drive to Highland Park Emergency Room at 5150 Lemmon Ave., Suite 108, in Dallas. You can also call the emergency center at 214-443-8131. No appointments are necessary.

Highland Park Emergency Center
214.396.4550

5150 Lemmon Ave Suite 108
Dallas, Texas 75209

http://highlandparker.com

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Severe pain ripples through your chest. The same pain hits your arm, neck and jaw. Are you suffering from a heart attack? Knowing the symptoms of a heart attack, and calling for emergency medical help quickly, could save your life.

Your risk of suffering a heart attack rise as you age. That’s why the medical professionals at Highland Park Emergency Center in Dallas recommend that you study both the symptoms and causes of heart attacks.

A heart attack occurs when one or more of the arteries delivering blood to the heart are blocked. This prevents the oxygen in blood from reaching the heart muscle. This damages the heart.

Cardiac arrest, often confused with a heart attack, is different but just as scary and potentially deadly. It occurs when the heart's lower chambers, known as the ventricles, suddenly develop a rapid and irregular rhythm. This condition, known as ventricular fibrillation, causes the ventricles to quiver rather than contract fully. This transforms the heart into a pump that can no longer supply the body and brain with oxygen.

People who are having a heart attack experience:

  • severe chest pain
  • pain in the neck, arm or jaw
  • shortness of breath
  • dizziness
  • sweating

Both men and women face a greater risk of heart attack and sudden cardiac arrest as they age. The Mayo Clinic says that men who are 45 and older and women who are 55 and older are more likely to suffer a heart attack. The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation says that cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death among adults over the age of 40.

While you can't do anything about getting older, you can take other steps to lessen your chances of suffering a heart attack. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the following steps can boost your heart's health:

  • Quit smoking: Tobacco use increases the risk of heart disease and heart attack.
  • Eat a healthy diet: Diets high in saturated fats and cholesterol are bad for your heart. Eat a nutritious diet heavy with vegetables, fruit, lean meats and nuts.
  • Exercise: Physical inactivity is not only related to heart disease, it can also lead to other risk factors for heart attacks and cardiac arrest. These include high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes.
  • Don't drink excessively: Consuming too much alcohol leads to an increase in blood pressure, which increases the risk for heart disease.

You should visit your physician on a regular basis as you age -yearly physicals are an important part of any health plan.

And, if you do think you might be having a heart attack, be sure that you or someone else calls 911 immediately. You need care at your local emergency room.

The next time you or someone you know has an emergency, go to Highland Park Emergency Center at 5150 Lemmon Ave., Suite 108, in Dallas. No appointments are necessary.

Highland Park Emergency Center
214.396.4550

5150 Lemmon Ave Suite 108
Dallas, Texas 75209

http://highlandparker.com

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The Dallas summer heat drains you. Then, the humidity exhausts you. The result can be dangerous dehydration that can land you in the hospital – or worse.

During summer, the Dallas area’s humid subtropical climate can be brutal, with temperatures well over 100 degrees and heat indices as high as 117 degrees. With the combination of heat and humidity, Dallas ranks fourth among the most uncomfortable U.S. cities.

With this weather commonplace in the summer months, children and adults alike must guard their health against severe hydration, which can sneak up faster than you think. Follow this guide to learn about the symptoms of dehydration, plus the strategies for dealing with this serious illness.

Drinking water is critical during hot weather. Remember, water makes up about 60 percent of the average person’s body weight. According to the Institute of Medicine, men need to drink an average of 13 cups of fluid a day, while women need about nine cups.

Thirst alone is not the best indicator of dehydration. In fact, for children and older adults, thirst is not a reliable measure of the body’s need for water. A better gauge is the color of the urine. If it’s clear or light-colored, the body is hydrated. Dark yellow or amber urine suggests dehydration.

Symptoms of mild to moderate dehydration include:

  • Thirst and a dry, sticky mouth
  • Dizziness
  • Sleepiness
  • Lethargy and less activity in children
  • Dry skin
  • Headache
  • Constipation
  • Few or no tears when crying
  • Decreased urine output, such as eight hours or more without urination for children or no wet diapers for infants over three hours or more.

Severe dehydration, which requires immediate medical attention, can create symptoms including:

  • Extreme thirst
  • Extreme fussiness or sleepiness in infants and children
  • Irritability and confusion in adults
  • Very dry mouth, skin and mucous membranes
  • No sweating
  • Little or no urination
  • Sunken eyes
  • Shriveled, dry skin that lacks elasticity
  • Low blood pressure
  • Rapid heartbeat and breaking
  • No tears when crying
  • Fever
  • Delirium or unconsciousness in severe cases

If an adult experiences mild to moderate dehydration, the treatment is simple. Drink more fluids, including water and sports drinks. Children and older adults need to be watched more carefully.

If severe signs persist, it’s time to visit a medical professional immediately for:

  • Extreme thirst, a lack of urination, shriveled skin, dizziness or confusion
  • Severe diarrhea, with or without vomiting or fever
  • Bloody stool
  • Moderate diarrhea for three days or more
  • Inability to keep down fluids
  • Irritability, disorientation, sleepiness or lethargy

In any of these cases, don’t hesitate to get the medical treatment you need. Head to Highland Park Emergency Center, a free-standing emergency room right in your neighborhood. An emergency room physician can see you quickly, evaluate your condition, and take steps to remedy dehydration immediately.

Highland Park Emergency Center
214.396.4550

5150 Lemmon Ave Suite 108
Dallas, Texas 75209

http://highlandparker.com