News
 
Gravatar
Pin on Pinterest
Meghan Labiak Labiak will represent TWU's College of Business (which just opened in 2018) as the first recipient of the Virginia Chandler Dykes Scholarship from that college. Each year Virginia Chandler Dykes scholarships are given to one graduate student from each of TWU's colleges. She will be honored on Feb. 27.

 

Five Scholarship Awards to be presented at 17th Annual TWU Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon Honoring

Dale Petroskey for his leadership in the community

Meghan Labiak, a graduate student pursuing a Dual MBA/MHSM (Master of Business Administration and Master of Health System Management) in Texas Woman’s University’s new College of Business (COB), which opened in 2018, is the inaugural Virginia Chandler Dykes Scholarship Recipient from that college. She will be honored as one of five scholarship recipients, representing each of TWU’s colleges, on February 27 at the 17th Annual Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon, presented by Bank of Texas, Texas Woman’s University, and the Texas Woman’s University Foundation, at The Belo Mansion and Pavilion.  She expects to complete her coursework in 2020.

Labiak has 8 ½ years of experience as a licensed speech language pathologist and has worked in a variety of settings including hospitals, rehabilitation centers, and skilled nursing facilities. Labiak resides in Dallas and is currently employed at Parkland Hospital, where she treats adults who have sustained acquired brain injuries.

A native of Bellmore, New York, Labiak was influenced by two hard-working parents. Her father is an engineer, and her mother is a physical therapist.

“Both of my parents moved into leadership roles within their occupations, and I always knew I wanted to do something in health care,” added Labiak. “My mother guided me toward a career in speech pathology. While my work at the bedside has been extremely rewarding, I have seen many changes within the healthcare industry and know that many more are on the horizon,” said Meghan Labiak. “I feel as though my experience as a frontline clinician will be extremely beneficial as a manager or health care employee in a different capacity.”

Labiak completed her bachelor’s in speech language pathology at Towson University in Maryland, where she played Division I Soccer and was awarded the Maryland Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (MACDA) Post-Graduate Scholarship.  She then completed her master’s in speech language pathology at Columbia University, Teachers College, and graduated in 2010.

“I feel so honored to be receiving this scholarship,” added Labiak. “The fact that Virginia Chandler Dykes has accomplished so much within the field of rehabilitation makes it even more special for me. I am thankful to continue my studies with reduced financial burden.”

“Meghan Labiak is a professional, a practicing speech pathologist working in the health care industry who came to the College of Business to hone her business skills,” said Dr. James Lumpkin, Dean, College of Business. “Completing her MBA will allow her to gain relevant management skills that will help her advance professionally, and the COB is proud to place a spotlight on this deserving young woman.”

In addition to Labiak, graduate students from the remaining four TWU colleges will be honored at the luncheon as recipients of Virginia Chandler Dykes scholarship funds: Patricia Flint, College of Education; Amie Bedgood, College of Nursing; Paramita Basu, College of Arts and Sciences; and Janice Kishi Chow, College of Health Sciences, OT.

In the past 16 years, more than $700,000 has been raised for scholarships from the proceeds of this luncheon.  TWU’s 17th Annual Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon, on February 27 at the Belo Mansion and Pavilion, will honor Dale Petroskey, president and CEO, Dallas Regional Chamber as the 2019 recipient of the Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award.  Tickets for the February 27 luncheon are $175 for silver patron; $250 for gold patron.  For more information, call 940-898-3865, visit www.twu.edu/vcd, or email kquinones@twu.edu.

Texas Woman’s University is the nation’s largest public university primarily for women with 15,500 students at its three locations in Denton, Dallas and Houston. Texas Woman’s is known for its contributions and leadership in the fields of education, nutrition, business, the arts and sciences, and especially in the nursing and health care professions. The university offers the student support, class sizes and campus esthetics more typically found at a private university. For more information, visit www.twu.edu or call 940-TWU-2000.

Gravatar
Pin on Pinterest
Virginia Chandler Dykes and Scholarship Recipients Janice Kishi Chow, Patricia Flint, Amie Bedgood, Virginia Chandler Dykes, Paramita Basu, Meghan Labiak

 

Five Scholarship Awards to be presented at 17th Annual TWU Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon

 Honoring Dale Petroskey for his leadership in the community

 

Texas Woman’s University is helping graduate students achieve their dreams even if they do not live near one of TWU’s campuses. Two outstanding TWU graduate students, Amie Bedgood, MSN, RN, (College of Nursing), who resides in New Braunfels, Texas, and Janice Kishi Chow (College of Health Sciences-Occupational Therapy), who lives in Northern California, will be recognized as two of the five TWU graduate students who will receive Virginia Chandler Dykes Scholarships at the 17th Annual Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon.  The luncheon, presented by Bank of Texas, Texas Woman’s University, and the Texas Woman’s University Foundation, will take place on February 27, at the Belo Mansion and Pavilion and will honor Dale Petroskey, president and CEO, Dallas Regional Chamber, with the annual leadership award.

Since she was old enough to know what a nurse was, Amie Bedgood wanted to be one. With a passion for working with women, children and youth, Bedgood has focused her experiences in maternal child health working in labor and delivery, postpartum, and newborn nursery for more than 20 years. Bedgood knew while pursuing her bachelor’s at Stephen F. Austin University that she wanted to pursue a career in nursing academia. She is currently in the final phases of earning a Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing from Texas Woman’s University, with a 3.8 GPA and plans to graduate in December. Bedgood’s research focus is patient safety with an emphasis on teamwork and communication.

“My parents were always intrigued by my interest in nursing because I did not have any one person in my background that influenced this decision,” said Amie Bedgood. “However, I always had a heart for people and helping them.  My mother was an elementary educator for 43 years, and I never imagined that I would want to teach. But as I learned more about what nurses did and their role in impacting future generations, I grew to understand their importance and how they make a difference and empower the lives of patients and students.”

A resident of New Braunfels, Texas, Bedgood has worked as an instructor of nursing at Texas Lutheran University since 2014. She is also a mentor and advisor for undergraduate students.

Bedgood received her master’s from the University of Texas at Tyler in 2001.  Prior to teaching at Texas Lutheran, she worked as the camp nurse at T Bar M Camps and as associate professor at Austin Community College.  She has worked as a registered nurse at Central Texas Medical Center in San Marcos, Texas; Therapeutic Communities in Staples, Texas; and Seton Family of Hospitals in Kyle, Texas.

Bedgood would like to earn tenure at her current institution of employment by September 2020.  Her goal is to contribute to the body of nursing knowledge through research, publications and speaking engagements.

She is a member of Sigma Theta Tau International, Texas Nurses Association, American Nurses Association, Association of Teachers of Maternal Child Health, and the National League of Nursing.  She has been the recipient of numerous awards and honors including multiple scholarships and received the graduate nurse excellence award while at UT Tyler. Additionally, she has been an active campus and community service volunteer throughout her career and held numerous leadership positions. During her undergraduate studies she maintained the Dean’s List all semesters and graduated from her master’s program with a 3.7 GPA.  In 2017 her abstract on a pre-nursing boot camp that she developed and implemented at Texas Lutheran University was accepted for a podium presentation at the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Baccalaureate conference in Atlanta, Georgia.

“Amie’s performance in the classroom and in clinical settings is exemplary,” said Sandra Cesario, PhD/DNP Program Coordinator and Professor, College of Nursing, TWU-Houston. “She has the academic ability, clinical skills, research experience, and the self-motivation to become a noted scholar and researcher in the nursing community.  She is truly an asset to the profession.”

Bedgood and her husband have been married for 21 years and have three children, 18, 15, and 10.

“It is truly an honor to receive this scholarship,” added Bedgood. “It has helped me significantly in my academic endeavors and this final phase of my dissertation work. I often think back to the advice of my advisor Ann Young. In August 2014 she said that this program was a marathon and not a sprint, and this excellent advice has helped me to learn to be patient and pace myself. It’s important for any student undertaking a PhD in nursing to not look too far into the future, but take it one day at a time, be organized, and think about the big picture of what you are trying to accomplish.  You can do anything you are committed to!”

Janice Kishi Chow has been an occupational therapist for 23 years with 15 years as part of a multidisciplinary team at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs (VA) Hospice and Palliative Care Center in Palo Alto, California.  During that time, she has seen the importance of occupational therapy services at the end of life.  She is pursuing a PhD in Occupational Therapy through Texas Woman’s University’s hybrid online program, with a 4.0 GPA and a completion date of December 2019. 

“Often people who are dying are not seen as living and not provided supportive services, such as occupational therapy, to help them still participate in valued activities,” said Janice Kishi Chow. “Helping people compensate, adapt, or rethink an enjoyable and self-defining activity through occupational therapy may mean all the difference in the last weeks and days of their lives.”

Chow’s family life had a significant influence on her career direction.  Her mother, a retired nurse, has always had a heart for helping older adults, especially at the end of life. When Chow was a child, her mother would take her along to visit and help elderly friends and family in the community. Additionally, her mother went back to school while Chow was in high school.

“Observing my mother as parent, nurse, and student exemplified to me how I could make a difference in multiple life spheres and gave me the desire to work in end-of-life care,” added Chow.

It is Chow’s goal to contribute research on the effectiveness of occupational therapy in end-of-life care to support greater utilization and funding of hospice occupational therapy services. Chow shared a story about a patient at the VA named John whom she fit with a power wheelchair.

“John had metastatic prostate cancer and consequent paraplegia and was resigned that nothing could be done for him. He had declined our repeated efforts to get him out of bed,” added Chow.  “He finally relented and figured out how to maneuver the wheelchair down the hallway. As staff greeted him, surprised to see him out of bed, he shyly looked down, smirking with pride. At the end of our session he proclaimed his goal – to independently drive the power wheelchair to the hospital retail store downstairs. We made plans for additional training to help him meet his goal. Through occupational therapy, he was able to connect with others, expand his world outside of his hospital room, and set a plan for the immediate future.”

Chow feels that occupational engagement throughout the lifespan is essential and warrants advocacy. Further work is needed to increase access to occupation-based interventions among people living with life-limiting illness. To increase professional awareness, Chow has given oral and poster presentations at state and national level conferences on the role of occupational therapy in hospice and palliative care, occupation-base interventions for chronic and terminal illness, and capturing interventional outcomes in end-of-life care.  She has also written a textbook chapter on hospice and palliative occupational therapy and contributed to the 2016 American Occupational Therapy Association position statement on hospice care.

Chow received her clinical doctorate in occupational therapy in 2014 from Temple University, her master’s in occupational therapy from Tufts University in 1995 and her bachelor’s from the University of California-Davis, graduating Cum Laude, in 1991. She is a member of the American Occupational Therapy Association and the Occupational Therapy Association of California.

“Since starting her PhD program, Janice has demonstrated a thoughtful approach, depth of commitment to her studies, and a passion for occupational therapy in end-of-life care,” said Noralyn Pickens, OT, PhD, Professor, Associate Director, Dallas Center, School of Occupational Therapy, T. Boone Pickens Institute of Health Sciences. “Her work has the potential to solidify our profession as critical to quality care in hospice through physical, psycho-social, and spiritual-emotional interventions.”

“I am deeply honored and grateful for the generosity of Virginia Chandler Dykes, her family, and the scholarship committee,” added Chow. “Many overlook the needs of the terminally ill, seeing the lack of life span synonymous with lack of long-term investment.  The investment of the Virginia Chandler Dykes family and scholarship committee in hospice occupational therapy research reflects a passion to make a difference in people’s lives, no matter what the life expectancy, and a visionary investment for our future.”

Chow lives in Northern California with her husband and two daughters. 

In addition to Bedgood and Chow, one graduate student from each of the remaining three TWU colleges will be honored at the luncheon as recipients of Virginia Chandler Dykes scholarship funds: Patricia Flint, College of Professional Education (COPE); Paramita Basu, College of Arts and Sciences; and Meghan Labiak, College of Business.

In the past 16 years, more than $700,000 has been raised for scholarships from the proceeds of the Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon. Tickets for the February 27 luncheon are $175 for silver patron; $250 for gold patron.  For more information, call 940-898-3865, visit www.twu.edu/vcd, or email kquinones@twu.edu.

Texas Woman’s University is the nation’s largest public university primarily for women with 15,500 students at its three locations in Denton, Dallas and Houston. Texas Woman’s is known for its contributions and leadership in the fields of education, nutrition, business, the arts and sciences, and especially in the nursing and health care professions. The university offers the student support, class sizes and campus esthetics more typically found at a private university. For more information, visit www.twu.edu or call 940-TWU-2000.

Gravatar
Pin on Pinterest
Paramita Basu will represent the College of Arts and Sciences at TWU as that college's graduate student to receive the Virginia Chandler Dykes Scholarship on Feb. 27, at the Belo Mansion

 

Five Virginia Chandler Dykes Scholarship Awards (honoring one graduate student from each of TWU's five colleges) will be presented at the

17th Annual TWU Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon honoringDalePetroskey for his leadership in the community

 

With a passion for teaching and research, Denton resident Paramita Basu is pursuing a PhD in molecular biology from Texas Woman’s University, where she has a 3.95 GPA. She is currently an instructor of record in the Department of Biology at TWU and would like to become an independent faculty member and researcher within the next five years. She plans to complete her doctoral degree in the summer of 2019.

Basu has been named the Virginia Chandler Dykes scholarship recipient from the College of Arts and Sciences and will be honored on February 27 at the 17th Annual Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon, presented by Bank of Texas, Texas Woman’s University, and the Texas Woman’s University Foundation, at The Belo Mansion and Pavilion. 

Basu has been both a graduate research assistant and graduate teaching assistant for plant biology and life sciences laboratories since 2014. Her research project focuses on identifying plant chemicals and discovering the mechanism of action in cell cultures (neurons and cancer cells) for potential use in treating pain and cancers.

“The results of this interdisciplinary collaborative project will result in the discovery of new phytochemicals that could become the basis for new and effective pain relieving and anti-cancer drugs,” said Paramita Basu. “Reducing reliance on opioid-based and central nervous system-targeted pain medications will reduce addiction and optimize pain management.”

Before coming to TWU in 2012, Basu completed her master’s degree in plant biochemistry and molecular biology in 2010 and her bachelor’s degree in botany in 2008 at the University of Calcutta, India. She pursued a master’s for two years at TWU before transferring into the PhD program in 2014. She credits her parents and sister for her passion for learning and critical thinking.

“My elder sister Dr. Arpita Basu, who graduated with her PhD in nutritional sciences in 2001 and is an associate professor at the University of Nevada in Las Vegas, has been my greatest inspiration in my pursuit of doctoral studies,” added Basu.  “Moreover, my parents have also played a key role by motivating and encouraging me to pursue my higher studies in the U.S.”

“I have learned so much and developed my mentorship skills through teaching,” added Paramita Basu. “In the future, I would also like to pursue a postdoctoral fellowship and collaborate extensively with cancer and pain researchers in the United States and worldwide.” 

In addition to her PhD project, Basu has also worked and published results of other independent projects including one that focused on the effect of mulberry extracts on diabetes and another on the estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities of dietary supplements.

“These projects employed novel experimental approaches and the results could be significant for the medical field in treating diabetes, osteoporosis and menopausal systems,” said Camelia Maier, PhD, professor, Department of Biology. “Paramita is one of the few students I have had who is able to design and schedule experiments to obtain meaningful and reliable results that have been published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at national conferences.”

Her record of publications includes four articles, two of which are published in Pharmacognosy Research, one in International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, and one in Biomedicine and Pharmacotherapy, a book chapter published in Biomarkers in Disease: Methods, Discoveries and Applications; and ten peer-reviewed abstracts published in numerous scientific journals. Basu has presented her research as posters at the annual Experimental Biology conferences (2015-2018), American Pain Society (2016 and 2018), Society for Neuroscience (2016) and Sigma Xi (2015, juried presentation) meetings.

Basu is the recipient of multiple scholarships and travel awards based on her academic and research performances.  She is also an active member of the American Society for Nutrition, American Pain Society, Society of Neuroscience, American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and honor societies such as Sigma Xi – The Scientific Research Society, Golden Key International Honor Society, and the National Society of Leadership and Success Honor Society.

“It feels wonderful to be selected from the College of Arts and Sciences to receive the Virginia Chandler Dykes Scholarship,” added Basu. “I am honored and humbled to receive this scholarship and would like to convey my gratitude to Virginia Chandler Dykes and the scholarship committee.”

Basu resides in Denton.

In addition to Basu, graduate students from the remaining four TWU colleges will be honored at the luncheon as recipients of Virginia Chandler Dykes scholarship funds: Patricia Flint, College of Education; Amie Bedgood, College of Nursing; Janice Kishi Chow, College of Health Sciences (OT); and Meghan Labiak, College of Business.

In the past 16 years, more than $700,000 has been raised for scholarships from the proceeds of this luncheon.  TWU’s 17th Annual Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon, on February 27 at the Belo Mansion and Pavilion, will honor Dale Petroskey, president and CEO, Dallas Regional Chamber as the 2019 recipient of the Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award.  Tickets for the February 27 luncheon are $175 for silver patron; $250 for gold patron.  For more information, call940-898-3865, visit www.twu.edu/vcd, or email kquinones@twu.edu.

Texas Woman’s University is the nation’s largest public university primarily for women with 15,500 students at its three locations in Denton, Dallas and Houston. Texas Woman’s is known for its contributions and leadership in the fields of education, nutrition, business, the arts and sciences, and especially in the nursing and health care professions. The university offers the student support, class sizes and campus esthetics more typically found at a private university. For more information, visit www.twu.edu or call 940-TWU-2000.

Gravatar
Pin on Pinterest
McKinney resident Patricia Flint Flint will receive the Virginia Chandler Dykes Scholarship for the College of Professional Education on Feb. 27.

 

Five Scholarship Awards to be presented at 17th Annual TWU Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon Honoring

Dale Petroskey for his leadership in the community

After working 15 years as a certified teacher, instructional specialist, response to intervention (RTI) coordinator, and administrator, McKinney resident Patricia Flint found that most teachers are not prepared for the diverse group of learners they have in their classroom each school year.  In 2017, Flint decided to quit her job as an assistant principal and become a full-time doctoral student pursuing a PhD in special education with a minor in biliteracy education at Texas Woman’s University, where she maintains a 4.0 GPA. She will complete her coursework in the fall of 2019 with an anticipated graduation date of 2020.

“All teachers and educators need to be prepared to meet the needs of all students who walk through the school doors,” said Patricia Flint. “I want to use my degree to enhance teacher preparation programs as well as help school systems design protocols to help special education students and educators in need. Ultimately, I would like to be a professor in a teacher education program at a university like TWU that puts positive relationships and students first.”

Flint has been named the Virginia Chandler Dykes scholarship recipient from the College of Professional Education and will be honored on February 27 at the 17th Annual Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon, presented by Bank of Texas, Texas Woman’s University, and the Texas Woman’s University Foundation, at The Belo Mansion and Pavilion. 

Flint currently works as part of the ELLevate! grant team, where she supports research and training efforts for teachers who work with English Language Learners.  This $2.5 million scholarship and research project is the product of the collaboration between Texas Woman’s University and the Denton Independent School District (DISD). It supports more than 300 faculty members, administrators and professional support staff in their goal of improving the instruction of high school English language learners (ELLs) and is sponsored by the Office of English Language Acquisition of the U.S. Department of Education (OELA).

“Working with adolescent emergent bilinguals and their teachers has completely changed my perspectives on education and learning while offering me many opportunities to grow,” said Patricia Flint. I have also had the opportunity to co-author two articles and a book chapter that are currently in the publishing process, write a discussion guide, and be a co-presenter for numerous conferences at the local, regional, state, and national level due to my work on this grant and coursework.” 

Flint has found that she has had to realign her ways of teaching through her work with emergent bilinguals.  She had to transition from being the teacher who was the sole provider of knowledge to a co-learner alongside her emergent bilingual students.

Flint fondly recalls her first teaching experience in 1987 when she was studying to be a social worker. She was assigned an internship at Wildwood School, a private special education school in upstate New York.  It was not the internship she had requested.  The unit consisted of nine adolescent students who could not be in a main-stream setting in public schools because of severe disabilities and aggressive behaviors and one special education teacher, four aides, a social worker and a speech therapist.

“I quickly learned this was an extraordinary group of adolescents and educators,” added Flint. “I enjoyed this internship so much, I applied for a job the following semester and changed my major to special education.  I worked there for the next six years as an aide, recreation counselor, and a mentor for the young adult program. I feel fortunate to have had this experience where we truly worked together as a team and always had to think outside of the box to help these students who were facing difficult and emotional situations. I continue to share these valuable lessons with my teammates today.”

Flint received her master’s degree from TWU in 2012 and knew there was no other school where she would want to pursue her goals. Her honors include K. Patricia Cross Future Leaders Award, 2019 (Nominee) and Outstanding Graduate Research Associate Award, 2018.

“Tricia has shown great initiative as a doctoral student, looking for opportunities to serve the university and quickly earning a reputation as a hard worker,” said Diane Myers, Chair, Department of Teacher Education. “She exemplifies the spirit and vision of Virginia Chandler Dykes as well as that of TWU and is not afraid to ‘boldly go.’  I look forward to having her as a colleague in the field of special education.”

Flint and her husband have been married for 30 years and have three children. Flint is the first in her family to earn a PhD.

“I feel very grateful and humbled to have been chosen for this scholarship and to be in the company of the other current and past recipients,” added Flint.

In addition to Flint, graduate students from the remaining four TWU colleges will be honored at the luncheon as recipients of Virginia Chandler Dykes scholarship funds: Janice Kishi Chow, College of Health Sciences (Occupational Therapy); Amie Bedgood, College of Nursing; Paramita Basu, College of Arts and Sciences; and Meghan Labiak, College of Business.

In the past 16 years, more than $700,000 has been raised for scholarships from the proceeds of this luncheon.  TWU’s 17th Annual Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon, on February 27 at the Belo Mansion and Pavilion, will honor Dale Petroskey, president and CEO, Dallas Regional Chamber as the 2019 recipient of the Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award.  Tickets for the February 27 luncheon are $175 for silver patron; $250 for gold patron.  For more information, call 940-898-3865, visit www.twu.edu/vcd, or email kquinones@twu.edu.

Texas Woman’s University is the nation’s largest public university primarily for women with 15,500 students at its three locations in Denton, Dallas and Houston. Texas Woman’s is known for its contributions and leadership in the fields of education, nutrition, business, the arts and sciences, and especially in the nursing and health care professions. The university offers the student support, class sizes and campus esthetics more typically found at a private university. For more information, visit www.twu.edu or call 940-TWU-2000.

Gravatar
Pin on Pinterest
TWU’s Virginia Chandler Dykes Award Announcement Dr. Carine Feyten, Norm Bagwell, Dale Petroskey, Virginia Chandler Dykes, Bob White, Ralph Hawkins

 

Petroskey will be honored with 17th Annual Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award at luncheon on February 27

 

Dale Petroskey, president and CEO, Dallas Regional Chamber, has been named the recipient of the 17th Annual Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award, presented by Bank of Texas and Texas Woman’s University and the Texas Woman’s University Foundation. The announcement was made at the Park Cities Club on November 13 at a reception hosted by Norman Bagwell, the 2018 Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award recipient, and Robin Bagwell. Texas Woman’s University Chancellor and President Dr. Carine M. Feyten will present the award at the Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award luncheon, Feb. 27, 2019, 11:15 a.m. to 1:15 p.m., at the Belo Mansion and Pavilion, 2101 Ross Ave., Dallas, Texas, 75201. The luncheon is chaired by Ralph Hawkins, recipient of the 2015 Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award.

“We are honored to present Dale Petroskey with the 17th Annual Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award,” said Carine M. Feyten, Ph.D., Texas Woman’s University chancellor and president. “Throughout his career, Dale has served as an advocate for economic development through pro-growth public policy. He sees the need for a strong talent pipeline to meet the future requirements of local businesses, and he supports educational initiatives and improvements to make this a reality. He is a visionary leader in the community, whom we are pleased to recognize for his incredible business acumen, dedication, discipline and persistence.”

Dale Petroskey has more than 30 years of leadership experience in the public, private, and non- profit sectors. In April 2014, he became president and CEO of the Dallas Regional Chamber, one of the largest and most established business organizations in the state of Texas, representing 1,100 member companies. The DRC works to strengthen the business community by attracting companies and talented workers from around the world, improving education, advocating for pro-growth public policies, and enhancing the quality of life for all in the Dallas Region.

Mr. Petroskey’s career also includes service as Assistant White House Press Secretary to President Ronald Reagan; senior vice president for Mission Programs at National Geographic; and president of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York.

Mr. Petroskey is a member of numerous boards, including the Dallas Citizens Council, The Salvation Army of DFW, Dallas Medical Resources, Educate Dallas, SMU’s Lyle School of Engineering, The Alfalfa Club of Washington, D.C., the Texas Rangers Baseball Foundation, Clayton Kershaw’s Challenge, and the Dallas Mavericks Advisory Council.

Mr. Petroskey and his wife, Ann, both graduates of Michigan State University, live in Dallas and have three grown children.

Established in 2002, the Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award is given annually to Dallas leaders with a lifelong commitment to improving the quality of life in the community and to furthering the importance of education. The award recognizes the life work of TWU alumna Virginia Chandler Dykes as an outstanding health care provider whose professional and civic achievements represent a lifetime committed to helping others.  Past award recipients are Norman P. Bagwell, 2018; Stephen L. Mansfield, 2017; Frances Anne “Francie” Moody-Dahlberg, 2016; Ralph Hawkins, 2015; Mary Brinegar, 2014; Patricia and Curtis Meadows, 2013; Myrna D. Schlegel and Kimberly Schlegel Whitman, 2012; Joel Allison, 2011; Kathleen Mason, 2010; Caroline Rose Hunt, 2009; T. Boone Pickens, 2008; Lindalyn Bennett Adams, 2007; Marnie and Kern Wildenthal, 2006; Gretchen Minyard Williams and J.L. “Sonny” Williams, 2005; Geraldine “Tincy” Miller, 2004; and Susan and Charles Cooper, 2003. 

“I am humbled to receive the 2019 Virginia Chandler Dykes Award and to join the distinguished list of previous honorees, including former Dallas Regional Chamber (DRC) Chairs Steve Mansfield, Ralph Hawkins, and Norm Bagwell,” said Dale Petroskey. “The DRC is proud to partner with Texas Woman’s University to increase college access and completion rates for our college students, and to connect them to the workforce needs and opportunities in North Texas.”

The Virginia Chandler Dykes Award namesake, Virginia Chandler Dykes, is known internationally for her work in occupational therapy. In 2012, Virginia and her late husband Roland were honored by the American Occupational Therapy Association for their sustained philanthropic service to Occupational Therapy Education, and in 2011, they were honored with the Texas Occupational Therapy Distinguished Service Award. Locally, she is known for her leadership in many cultural and charitable organizations. She was named the 2016 Visionary Woman by the Juliette Fowler Communities, and in 2014 she was honored as one of six Women of the Year by Les Femmes du Monde. In 2005 she was appointed by Gov. Rick Perry to serve on the Texas Woman’s University Board of Regents, where she served until 2011.

 

Mrs. Dykes completed the graduate occupational therapy program at TWU in 1954 after earning her bachelor of arts in art and psychology from Southern Methodist University. She was the director of the Occupational and Recreational Therapy Department at Baylor University Medical Center for 25 years. In 2002, she established The Virginia Chandler Dykes endowed scholarship fund at TWU for occupational therapy students.  Net luncheon proceeds provide additional scholarships for each of TWU’s colleges: College of Health Sciences (Occupational Therapy), Nursing, Professional Education (COPE), and Arts and Sciences. This year, a fifth scholarship will be presented to a graduate student in TWU’s new College of Business. Mrs. Dykes and her late husband Roland also helped to establish the Fanny B. Vanderkooi Endowed Lectureship for the School of Occupational Therapy at TWU, which has grown to be one of the premier continuing education offerings in Texas. She is also well known for her leadership in organizations such as The Dallas Opera, the Dallas Arboretum’s Women’s Council and the Fort Worth Opera.

“In addition to honoring outstanding individuals in the community, the Virginia Chandler Dykes Luncheon provides scholarships for five outstanding graduate students, while continuing to grow the Virginia Chandler Dykes Endowment and helping the Dallas community better understand the value of TWU graduates to Dallas’ professional workforce,” added Dr. Feyten.

The following graduate students representing each of TWU’s five colleges will be honored at the luncheon as recipients of scholarship funds: Janice Kishi Chow, College of Health Sciences (Occupational Therapy); Amie Bedgood, College of Nursing; Patricia Flint, College of Professional Education (COPE); Paramita Basu, College of Arts and Sciences; and Meghan Labiak, College of Business.

In the past 16 years, more than $700,000 has been raised for scholarships from the proceeds of this luncheon.  Tickets for the February 27 luncheon are $175 for silver patron; $250 for gold patron.  For more information, call 940-898-3865, visit www.twu.edu/vcd, or email kquinones@twu.edu.

Gravatar
Pin on Pinterest
TWU Virginia Chandler Dykes Luncheon Luncheon Chair Ralph Hawkins; 2018 Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Recipient Norm Bagwell; Virginia Chandler Dykes; Dr. Carine Feyten; Bob White, Bank of Texas, presenting sponsor

Texas Woman’s University honored Norman P. Bagwell, CEO of Bank of Texas and Executive Vice President of BOK Financial, with the Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award at the 16th annual luncheon on February 21 at the Belo Mansion and Pavilion.

“An inspirational leader known for his business acumen, positive attitude, and devotion to the community, Norm Bagwell is a beloved and highly respected member of this community,” said Dr. Carine M. Feyten, Texas Woman's chancellor and president. “TWU is honored to present him with the 16th Annual Leadership Award.”

Bagwell began his remarks to the room of nearly 300 family members, friends, business colleagues and community leaders by praising Virginia Chandler Dykes and her lifelong work. “Virginia Chandler Dykes is a true pioneer who has made such an impact in education, and to have an award with her name on it is a real honor.” He also saluted the work of TWU, stating he has been a believer in TWU for some time.  “The university and its programs have been a real difference maker in our community. I have a long admired the work of TWU and Virginia Chandler Dykes.  Both have been at the forefront of building tomorrow’s workforce.”

Bagwell, the CEO of Bank of Texas and the executive vice president of BOK Financial, is responsible for all regional banks, commercial banking, business banking and treasury services across the eight-state footprint. Recently, he was named chairman of the Baylor Healthcare System Foundation and appointed trustee of the Salesmanship Club Foundation. Bagwell serves on several boards including the Board of Directors for Bank of Texas, Junior League of Dallas, and Panola Company LTD, and he is chairman of the CEO Council of the Dallas Arboretum and past chairman of the Dallas Regional Chamber. He is a member of the Salesmanship Club, Maverick Chapter WPO, Dallas Assembly and Dallas Citizens Council. 

Bagwell continued, “When it comes to banking, I am old school. I was taught that the end game was to build a high performing business that will stand the test of time.  I believe in doing business the right way with honor and integrity as well as building a team that is high performing, highly engaged, and collegial.  It’s important to create an environment where people can fulfill their personal and professional aspirations; to take care of the client in a way that is differentiated; and to deliver for the shareholder. Corporately, I believe it’s important to be an active citizen and contribute to the greater good.

“Through his leadership at Bank of Texas, Norm Bagwell demonstrates a commitment to serve others, which is evident in Bank of Texas’ partnership with this annual event since 2007,” added Dr. Feyten.

Bagwell concluded his remarks sharing what he has learned on his journey.

“When we experience tough times, life shares the gift of perspective. In my case, I strive to do the following:  try not to sweat the little things; make the most of every day; be impactful…make a difference where you can; try to be the part of the solution and not the problem; play the hand we are dealt the best we can; seek balance…body, mind and soul; and keep a positive attitude. But the most important thing I have learned is that LIFE IS A TEAM game.”

Bagwell is the recipient of numerous additional honors, including the Chairman’s Leadership Award from the Dallas Regional Chamber of Commerce, the Distinguished Alumni award from Southern Methodist University and Cox School of Business, and the Torch of Conscience award from the American Jewish Congress. In 2013, Bagwell and his wife, Robin, received the Margaret Sharpe Award for Community Service. He received his B.A. and B.B.A. degrees from Southern Methodist University, where he is a distinguished alumnus from the Cox School of Business.

The TWU award is named for alumna Virginia Chandler Dykes, who was director of occupational and recreational therapy at Baylor University Medical Center for 25 years. Dykes also established the Virginia Chandler Dykes Endowment to provide scholarships for TWU occupational therapy students. Luncheon proceeds will augment that fund.

The following graduate students, representing each of TWU’s four colleges, received scholarships, and each spoke at the luncheon: Kaye C. Rubio, College of Health Sciences (Occupational Therapy), Dawn Murphy, College of Nursing; Lorraine Cadwallader, College of Professional Education (COPE); and Geethanjali Ravindranathan, College of Arts and Sciences.

TWU holds the distinction of being the nation’s largest university primarily for women and is known for  its strengths in the fields of education, nutrition, business, the arts and sciences, and especially in the nursing and health care professions. The public institution has an enrollment of more than 15,000 students and campuses in Dallas, Denton and Houston.

Attendees included: former Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Recipients: Stephen Mansfield, 2017; Ralph Hawkins, 2015; Mary Brinegar, 2014; Myrna Schlegel, 2012; Kathleen Mason, 2010; Caroline Rose Hunt, 2009; as well as Charlotte and Fred Ball, Ann and Charles Eisemann, Angela Nash, Mike McCullough, Michael Meadows, Kathy and Nat Parker, Rowland Robinson, Ronald G. Steinhart, Roslyn Dawson Thompson, Vera and Robert Thornton, Velma and Jack Tolbert, and Joan and Alan Walne.

Guests enjoyed a luncheon of spinach and butter lettuce with brie and julienne of apple and sweet sherry vinaigrette; herb-dusted filet of beef with maître d ‘butter accompanied by Boursin cheese mashed potatoes, asparagus and a roasted tomato with milk chocolate mousse for dessert.

Sponsors include: $20,000: Bank of Texas, presenting sponsor; $5,000:  Sue and Christopher Bancroft; Baylor Scott & White Health; Luther King Capital Management; The Rosewood Corporation; Panola Company,  LTD; $2,500: The Men and Women of Hunt Consolidated, Inc.; Ty and Jan Miller; Locke Lord LLP.

For more information, visit twu.edu/vcd 

 

Gravatar
Pin on Pinterest
TWU Graduate Student Kaye Rubio Rubio, representing the College of Health Sciences, will receive one of four prestigious Virginia Chandler Dykes Scholarships on Feb. 21

 Four Scholarship Awards to be presented at 16th Annual TWU Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon Honoring

Norman Bagwell for his leadership in the community and his commitment to education

 

Driven by a thirst for knowledge, desire to learn, a need to be challenged, and faith in God, Kaye Rubio, an immigrant from Manila, Philippines, is pursuing her doctorate in Occupational Therapy from Texas Woman’s University, with a 3.9 GPA and plans to graduate in 2019. She is the first in her family to leave her home country, live on her own, and pursue an independent life in a foreign land. Rubio is receiving one of four prestigious scholarships given by Texas Woman’s University at the 16th Annual Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon, presented by Bank of Texas, Texas Woman’s University, and the Texas Woman’s University Foundation, February 21, at noon, at The Belo Mansion and Pavilion. 

She is currently working on her dissertation, focused on the role of occupational therapy in breast cancer-related lymphedema. After completing her PhD, she would like to pursue opportunities in research and academia while continuing to work in the clinical field. She would also like to use her degree to increase awareness of lymphedema and establish occupational therapy as a vital service in the rehabilitation of cancer survivors and those living with lymphedema. Her long-term goal is to return to her home country to give back to the University of the Philippines, where she began her journey as a therapist and lifelong learner. Presently, she is an occupational therapist at the Rehabilitation Hospital and Acute Care Unit at the Palms of Pasadena Hospital, in St. Petersburg, Florida.

“As a senior in high school, I prayed fervently for the Lord to show me what He wanted me to do in life, and I was accepted into the OT program at University of the Philippines in 1999,” said Kaye Rubio. “I had no idea what occupational therapy was, but today I know I am an occupational therapist at heart.  Additionally, I am a certified lymphedema therapist. My father died of cancer in 2005, and my mother, siblings, and I cared for him at home during the last four months of his life. This experience and knowing that I might be at risk motivated me to focus my research in cancer.”

Rubio received her bachelor’s in OT in 2003 from the University of the Philippines, the country’s premier institution of higher learning and the first university in the country and in Asia to offer a bachelor’s degree in OT. It was the only university her family could afford because tuition is subsidized by the government to enable low income students the opportunity to go to college. The program is recognized by the World Federation of Occupational Therapy, which allowed her to obtain a license to practice in the U.S. and pursue her education in this field. She prayed for an opportunity to leave the Philippines and was offered a position in Atlanta in 2005 at a pediatric home health company. Preferring to work with adults, she moved to Florida a year later to work in a skilled nursing facility. 

She received a master’s in health science with a major in OT in 2011 from the University of Florida while working full time as a therapist. She worked in a clinical setting for another two years and yearned for more education, resulting in her certification as a lymphedema therapist from the Norton School of Lymphatic Studies in 2012. She attempted an administrative role but found she was no longer challenged.  A friend and colleague in the PhD program at TWU motivated her to look into the program, and she began her PhD studies in 2014.

“My journey as an immigrant from a poor country taught me that opportunities, success, and a comfortable life are not privileges,” added Rubio.  “They are given to those who are willing to work hard and earn it.”

Rubio grew up in a loving home, but the family struggled financially.

“In our culture, the parents finance their children’s college education,” added Rubio. “After the eldest graduates and finds a job, he or she is expected to help raise the younger siblings.  I am the eldest and felt pressure to provide for my family at an early age.  Our culture also valued the importance of a college degree. My degree enabled me to financially support my younger brother and sister until they finished college, and the three of us support our mother.”

While Rubio felt close to her immediate family, she never felt a sense of belonging from the other members of the Filipino community, including extended family members.  Taught by her parents to be emotionally and mentally strong and trust God no matter what happens, Rubio, as young as 10 years old, yearned to be on her own in a place where she could express herself and not be harshly criticized. She was told she did not have intellectual skills or talent. She was 24 when she accepted a position in Atlanta and was finally able to leave the country.

Because of the criticism she received from the Filipino community and extended family members, she suffered from imposter syndrome and doubted her abilities during the first two years in the PhD program. She was able to overcome these feelings as she moved forward.

“The PhD program at TWU prepares its students to become excellent researchers deeply rooted in the value of occupational therapy,” added Rubio. “I chose to attend TWU because of its mentoring program. Each doctoral student, paired with a research mentor, receives one-on-one guidance and opportunities for networking. This journey has been a series of opportunities to learn and grow. Receiving the Virginia Chandler Dykes Scholarship was a surprise and affirmation that I have what it takes to complete the program.”

Rubio and her husband, also an occupational therapist, met at the University of the Philippines and reside in St. Petersburg, Florida. She is a member of numerous professional organizations, an active volunteer in the occupational therapy field, and the recipient of several previous scholarships from TWU.

In addition to Rubio, graduate students from the remaining three TWU colleges will be honored at the luncheon as recipients of Virginia Chandler Dykes scholarship funds:Dawn Murphy, College of Nursing, sponsored by Luther King Capital Management; Lorraine Cadwallader, College of Professional Education (COPE); and Geethanjali Ravindranathan, College of Arts and Sciences.

In the past 15 years, more than $700,000 has been raised for scholarships from the proceeds of this luncheon.  TWU’s 16th Annual Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon, on February 21 at the Belo Mansion and Pavilion, will honor Norman P. Bagwell, CEO of Bank of Texas and Executive Vice President of BOK Financial, as the 2018 recipient of the Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award.  Tickets are $175 for silver patron; $250 for gold patron.  For more information, call 940-898-3872, visit www.twu.edu/vcd, or email TRupani@twu.edu.

Gravatar
Pin on Pinterest
TWU Graduate Student Dawn Murphy Dawn Murphy, representing TWU's College of Nursing, will be honored with one of four Virginia Chandler Dykes Scholarships on Feb. 21

 

Four Scholarship Awards to be presented at 16th Annual TWU Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon Honoring

Norman Bagwell for his leadership in the community and his commitment to education

 

A pediatric nurse for almost 25 years, Dawn Murphy is pursuing her doctorate in nursing science/education from Texas Woman’s University, with a 4.0 GPA and plans to graduate in 2019. A resident of Colorado Springs, Colorado, Murphy is entering her fourth year as a part-time doctoral student in TWU’s online nursing education program. On February 21, she will receive one of four prestigious scholarships given by Texas Woman’s University at the 16th Annual Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon, presented by Bank of Texas, Texas Woman’s University, and the Texas Woman’s University Foundation, at The Belo Mansion and Pavilion. 

 

Inspired by her nieces and nephews from their use of social media, her dissertation will focus on the effect of social media behavior on adolescent mental health. After completing her PhD, she would like to teach fellow pediatric nurse practitioners at the graduate level, while continuing her work as a pediatric nurse practitioner on a part-time basis.  Presently she is a faculty member at Pikes Peak Community College (PPCC) in Colorado Springs, where she teaches courses in pediatrics and leadership, while assisting with nursing lab courses. She has also served as the coordinator of the nursing simulation lab and serves as a clinical instructor for pediatrics at the University of Colorado Health at Memorial Central Hospital. Additionally, she tries to work part-time in pediatric homecare when she can.

 

“I am very passionate about the health and development of children and their families and strive to inspire this same passion in nursing students I have the privilege to teach,” said Dawn Murphy.

 

Murphy received her bachelors in nursing from Mankato State University in Minnesota in 1991 and began her career in medical-surgical nursing at St. Mary’s/Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. She moved to Texas in 1993 and started working in pediatric nursing. She completed her master’s in nursing from TWU in 2000, obtaining her certification to work as a pediatric nurse practitioner. She worked at a number of hospital and school-based settings including Parkland Health and Hospital System’s school-based clinics in Dallas.  In 2008, she began teaching pediatrics and other areas of nursing in Colorado. Murphy began her PhD journey in 2014.

“I grew up on a dairy farm in Afton, Minnesota, where I was responsible for raising and nurturing baby calves as part of my chores,” added Murphy. “My dad was a Catholic deacon, my mom worked as a secretary for more than 30 years, and I have a brother and sister who were adopted from South Korea who are now in their 40s. The whole family worked together on the farm, and I believe this contributed to my journey into pediatric nursing. I have found that my strength lies in encouraging nurses to be the best nurses they can be. Many students I have encountered have a number of obstacles in their lives, and I think my years of working with children, adolescents, and their families have prepared me to work well with a variety of nursing students on their nursing career journeys. Someone once told me that leadership is not just a noun, but a verb, and I attempt to demonstrate this as I strive to model leadership for students and colleague in even the smallest of my actions every day.”

Murphy is a member of the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners and helped to plan a local conference in Denver two years ago. She has served as a faculty advisor for the Pikes Peak Community College Association of Nursing Students, is active on the college’s Diversity team, and enjoys participating in numerous community activities.  She is the recipient of multiple honors including nominee for Faculty of the Year award at Pikes Peak Community College in 2017; Master Teacher nomination from Front Range Community College in 2007-08; nominee for Outstanding Graduate Student at TWU in 2000; and nominee for the Dallas-Fort Worth Great 100 Nurses Award of Excellence in 1996 among others.

“Probably the greatest honor I have ever received was being asked by nursing students to be an honorary faculty guest speaker for nursing pinning ceremonies in 2012 and 2013,” added Murphy.

Murphy is very appreciative to TWU and all faculty, staff, and student colleagues who have made her journey possible.

“It is hard to describe my feelings about receiving this scholarship award,” added Murphy.  “I am blessed and so very thankful to Virginia Chandler Dykes, whose lifework has made it possible for me to continue my pediatric nursing journey. She has changed the lives of so many students working to pursue their dreams.”

In addition to Murphy, graduate students from the remaining three TWU colleges will be honored at the luncheon as recipients of Virginia Chandler Dykes scholarship funds: Kaye C. Rubio, College of Health Sciences (Occupational Therapy); Lorraine Cadwallader, College of Professional Education (COPE); and Geethanjali Ravindranathan, College of Arts and Sciences.

In the past 15 years, more than $700,000 has been raised for scholarships from the proceeds of this luncheon.  TWU’s 16th Annual Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon, on February 21 at the Belo Mansion and Pavilion, will honor Norman P. Bagwell, CEO of Bank of Texas and Executive Vice President of BOK Financial, as the 2018 recipient of the Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award.  Tickets are $175 for silver patron; $250 for gold patron.  For more information, call 940-898-3872, visit www.twu.edu/vcd, or email TRupani@twu.edu.

Gravatar
Pin on Pinterest
TWU Graduate Student Geethanjali Ravindranathan Ravindranathan, representing the College of Arts and Sciences, will receive one of four Virginia Chandler Dykes Scholarships at the annual leadership luncheon on Feb. 21

Four Scholarship Awards to be presented at 16th Annual TWU Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon

Honoring Norman Bagwell for his leadership in the community and his commitment to education

 

With a love for science, first ignited by her grandmother during her childhood, Geethanjali Ravindranathan, an aspirant from India, is pursuing her master’s in biology from Texas Woman’s University, with a 4.0 GPA and plans to graduate in May. Ravindranathan is receiving one of four prestigious scholarships given by Texas Woman’s University at the 16th Annual Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon, presented by Bank of Texas, Texas Woman’s University, and the Texas Woman’s University Foundation, February 21, at noon, at The Belo Mansion and Pavilion. 

“While studying in second grade in a small town in India, my grandma used a globe, a tennis ball and a flashlight in a dark room to teach me about eclipses,” said Ravindranathan. “That was the night the seed of my passion for science was sown. When she passed away from a combination of diabetes and liver disease, I resolved to take a career path wherein I would be able to understand the basis of diseases and identify treatments by manipulating the most basic component of humans that hold all the information: their genes.”

Ravindranathan is a third-year biology graduate research student working toward her master’s.  She would like to work for a research institute dedicated to population genetics, a field that studies variations in genes of a population with a particular disease and uses that information to treat and cure that disease.

“Ultimately, I would like to become a professor with my own lab setup so that I can continue my passions for both research and teaching and hopefully influence other young minds to pursue this amazing field of study,” added Ravindranathan.

She received her undergraduate degree in biotechnology in India. Due to the lack of research in her field of interest in India, she looked for higher education abroad and chose TWU.  She became the first female in her family to ever pursue a graduate degree and in a foreign country.

“I became an example and inspiration to my younger female cousins,” she added.  “My parents were very supportive and ensured their children’s educations were always prioritized.  They were very proud of me when I excelled at math and sciences.”

“My family is proud that I am receiving this scholarship and grateful for the financial assistance,” she added. “The visionary woman Virginia Chandler Dykes is one of my idols. It is an extreme honor to receive this scholarship, established by her, primarily for what it stands for. To know that I have been deemed worthy of this honor is a wonderful, life-changing and defining feeling.  It confirms that my career decisions and the paths I am taking are headed in the right direction.”

Ravindranathan is grateful for the many opportunities TWU has provided to help her to grow intellectually, professionally, and socially. 

“TWU is a wonderfully nurturing environment with people always ready to help,” she added. “It is one of the best universities in the nation, not just in terms of costs efficiency but also the value of the educational experience. My time here has been an amazing journey.”

Ravindranathan resides in Denton. She is a member of numerous professional organizations, an active volunteer, and holds several leadership roles, including serving as a student senator representing the biology department of TWU for the Graduate Student Council. Additionally, she serves as the current vice president of excellence within the council. She is also the president of the biology graduate student organization.

In addition to Ravindranathan, graduate students from the remaining three TWU colleges will be honored at the luncheon as recipients of Virginia Chandler Dykes scholarship funds:Dawn Murphy, College of Nursing; Lorraine Cadwallader, College of Professional Education (COPE); and Kaye C. Rubio, College of Health Sciences (Occupational Therapy).

In the past 15 years, more than $700,000 has been raised for scholarships from the proceeds of this luncheon.  TWU’s 16th Annual Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon, on February 21 at the Belo Mansion and Pavilion, will honor Norman P. Bagwell, CEO of Bank of Texas and Executive Vice President of BOK Financial, as the 2018 recipient of the Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award.  Tickets are $175 for silver patron; $250 for gold patron.  For more information, call 940-898-3872, visit www.twu.edu/vcd, or email TRupani@twu.edu.

Gravatar
Pin on Pinterest
TWU Graduate Student Lorraine Cadwallader Cadwallader is the TWU graduate student from College of Professional Education who will receive the Virginia Chandler Dykes Scholarship at this year's Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon

 

Four Scholarship Awards (recognizing one graduate student from each of TWU's Four Colleges) to be presented at 16th Annual TWU Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon Honoring Norman Bagwell for his leadership in the community and his commitment to education

 

A teacher for 25 years with a long-term goal to make the world a better place, Lorraine Cadwallader is pursuing a master’s degree in counseling and development with an emphasis in clinical mental health counseling to become a licensed professional counselor. She has maintained a 4.0 GPA and will graduate this spring. On February 21, she will receive one of four prestigious scholarships given by Texas Woman’s University at the 16th Annual Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon, presented by Bank of Texas, Texas Woman’s University, and the Texas Woman’s University Foundation, at The Belo Mansion and Pavilion. 

During her final semester of graduate school, she will continue to work at two sites for her internship: “The TWU Play Project” (providing play therapy to young elementary children in Denton ISD) and with alcoholics and addicts in an intensive outpatient program at CCD Counseling, PA, a private counseling agency in Denton.

Cadwallader received her bachelor’s degree in international studies from Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana, in 1983.  During her sophomore year she spent a semester in Mexico – an experience that changed her world view and prompted her to design her own major with an emphasis in Latin America.  She spent her senior year in Bogotá, Colombia, where she became fluent in Spanish. Cadwallader received her first master’s degree in education from TWU in 1990, graduating magna cum laude. Then she began a teaching career of 25 years focused on bilingual early childhood education in Dallas and Denton ISD.

“Enjoying meaningful work is something I learned from my parents and grandparents,” said Cadwallader. “My parents, both of whom are now retired college professors, provided me with a strong sense of personal ethical responsibility and the idea that ‘of course’ I would do something to make the world a better place.  The most important part of my job as a teacher was creating strong relationships with my students and their families. From my first day in the classroom, I wished I had some counseling skills in order to be more effective. Making differences in people’s lives is crucial for me – not only improving individual lives, but also improving society at large, starting with the Denton community and expanding to Texas, the United States, and the world.”

Cadwallader comes from a long line of strong women and is the third generation of women in her family with professional careers.  Her grandmother earned her PhD in chemistry in 1922, and her mother earned her PhD in philosophy in 1972. 

“It was unusual for women to earn advanced degrees in those fields during that time,” she added. “I’m grateful TWU is facilitating my following in their footsteps.”

In addition to teaching, Cadwallader has also served as a staff development trainer for Denton ISD and on many campus and district committees. As a teacher mentor of students at UNT, she was invited to be a presenter at the Velma E. Schmidt Conference and is the author of an article published in two early childhood textbooks. Additionally, after writing nine successful grants for innovative teaching methods, she became Denton ISD’s top Denton Public School Foundation grant recipient. She has also been an active volunteer in the community, often utilizing her Spanish skills.

Cadwallader has been recognized by her peers three times: at Tomás Rivera Elementary as “Teacher of the Year” (2007), as the Denton ISD District “Elementary Teacher of the Year” (2008) and as “Bilingual Teacher of the Year” at Obadiah Knight Elementary in Dallas ISD (1992). She has also been the recipient of numerous scholarship awards beginning with her undergraduate years.  She is a member of several professional organizations and Chi Sigma Iota, the counseling honor society, as well as Phi Kappa Phi.

Her journey has not been without challenges. 

“As an older graduate student working on my second master’s degree in a second career, one of the obstacles I have had is learning how to balance the demands of graduate school with family, work, and volunteering in the community,” added Cadwallader.  “I do believe that when my children see me work so hard and long, it must inspire them to believe that it is never too late to follow your dreams and make them a reality.”

“I am so honored to receive the Virginia Chandler Dykes Scholarship,” added Cadwallader. “It is allowing me to finish graduate school and pursue my career in counseling during an especially challenging time for my family as my husband is suffering from a critical illness.”

Cadwallader’s experiences at TWU have been very positive, as shehas found that TWU cares more about people than programs.

“My professors are not only extremely knowledgeable about the content they teach but also passionate about helping us to become the best counselors we can be,” added Cadwallader. “From secretaries to administrators, one experiences a ‘going the extra mile’ spirit. I am proud to be a part of a place where respect for diversity is highly valued.”

Cadwallader and her husband of 31 years (Sculptor Jerry Daniel) live in Denton.  They have four children.

In addition to Cadwallader, graduate students from the remaining three TWU colleges will be honored at the luncheon as recipients of Virginia Chandler Dykes scholarship funds: Kaye C. Rubio, College of Health Sciences (Occupational Therapy); Dawn Murphy, College of Nursing; and Geethanjali Ravindranathan, College of Arts and Sciences.

In the past 15 years, more than $700,000 has been raised for scholarships from the proceeds of this luncheon.  TWU’s 16th Annual Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award Luncheon, on February 21 at the Belo Mansion and Pavilion, will honor Norman P. Bagwell, CEO of Bank of Texas and Executive Vice President of BOK Financial, as the 2018 recipient of the Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award.  Tickets are $175 for silver patron; $250 for gold patron.  For more information, call 940-898-3872, visit www.twu.edu/vcd, or email TRupani@twu.edu.