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the black album.2020.resistance. at SMU
 
 

Award-Winning Theatre Artist Regina Taylor Partners With SMU Meadows School of the Arts To Present Project Exploring What It Is To Be Black in 2020

Project debuts with the black album. 2020. resistance., a free performance Oct. 27 & 29

 

DALLAS (SMU) --- Golden Globe-winning actress, director and playwright Regina Taylor is partnering with SMU Meadows School of the Arts and its Division of Theatre in a unique, three-part theatrical project titled the black album. 2020. Conceived by SMU Distinguished Alumna Taylor, who earned a theatre degree from Meadows in 1981, the project explores and addresses the question of what it is to be Black in 2020. 

“2020 is of historical significance, defined by COVID-19, social protest ignited by the murder of George Floyd and this year’s presidential election process,” says Taylor, a Dallas native. “We are on the brink – re-examining our past and challenging who we believe ourselves to be. How we deal with these events will affect generations to come.” 

The first part of the project – the black album. 2020. resistance. – features a 75-minute presentation, written and directed by Taylor. 

the black album is a series of snapshot scenes imagined through the lens of MC 2020, an SMU student who streams from his ‘woke’ mind,” says Taylor. “The piece captures the varied voices of African Americans questioning identity, social justice, history and fear of erasure in this current climate.” 

The show will be performed live at 8 p.m. October 27 and 29 on the SMU Meadows YouTube channel by seven Meadows undergraduate and graduate acting students. Sets, costumes, lighting, and sound will be created by Meadows theatre design students, alumni and faculty in collaboration with guest artists. Admission is free; to register to attend, visit https://blog.smu.edu/meadows/theblackalbum/

Taylor developed the project “to address questions about how we continue to teach and create theater in this time of COVID-19,” she says. “the black album also addresses how we as artists speak on social justice in our work. The play was written to give a platform for necessary conversations in this racially incendiary climate.” 

“The Division is honored to be working with Regina Taylor on this performance piece,” says Gretchen Smith, chair of Meadows’ theatre division. “It has been a pleasure to witness the strong artistic collaboration between Regina, our students, our alumni, our production team, and the wonderful guest artists who have joined us on this journey. I can’t wait for audiences to see the black album. 2020. resistance. in performance.” 

Two additional parts of the black album. 2020., including a collaboration with students and artists from SMU and institutions around the globe, and a roundtable presentation of noted BIPOC artistic directors and theater makers, are in the planning stages and will debut this winter and spring. 

About Regina Taylor

Actress/director/playwright/educator/activist Regina Taylor is the playwright-in-residence at the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis, a three-year appointment through the National Playwright Residency Program established by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and HowlRound Theatre Commons. Her play Oo-Bla-Dee is being presented at Repertory Theatre of St. Louis. Taylor is also writing new plays for Audible and for Southern Methodist University (the black album, about what it is to be Black in 2020). 

Her playwright credits include Bread (Edgerton Award, WaterTower Theatre); Crowns (four Helen Hayes Awards, including Best Director); Oo-Bla-Dee (Steinberg-ATCA award); Drowning Crow (Broadway, Manhattan Theatre Club); The Trinity River Plays (Edgerton Foundation New American Play Award); and stop.reset. (Signature Theatre Residency 5). 

Taylor received the Denzel Washington Endowed Chair in Theatre at Fordham University at Lincoln Center. An artistic associate of Goodman Theatre, Taylor is its most produced playwright. 

Taylor is featured in Netflix’s All Day and a Night starring Jeffrey Wright and Ashton Saunders and directed/written by Joe Robert Cole (writer for Black Panther), and guest stars on Council of Dads (NBC), The Red Line (producer Ava DuVernay, CBS), The Good Fight, and Lovecraft Country (producers Jordan Peele, J. J. Abrams and Misha Green). For her television role as Lily Harper in I’ll Fly Away, Taylor received a Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actress, three NAACP Image Awards and two Emmy Award nominations. Her other television roles include The Unit. Taylor was the first African American lead in Masterpiece Theatre’s Cora Unashamed, starred as Anita Hill in HBO’s Strange Justice (Gracie Award), and was featured in A Good Day to Die starring Sidney Poitier. She has co-starred in USA Network’s Dig and guest starred in Elementary and The Black List. Taylor’s film credits include Saturday Church, The Negotiator, Courage Under Fire, Clockers, and Lean on Me. Taylor was also the first Black woman to play Juliet in Romeo and Juliet on Broadway.

 

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Marmen Quartet
 

Marmen and Viano Quartets, Joint First-Place Winners of 2019 Banff International String Quartet Competition,

To Be SMU Meadows School of the Arts’ Peak Fellowship Ensembles-in-Residence Beginning in Fall 2020

 

Fellowship made possible by new $2.4 million gift in memory of Martha Raley Peak ’50

 

DALLAS (SMU) --- The Los Angeles-based Viano String Quartet and the London-based Marmen Quartet, which in September both tied as first-place winners of the renowned Banff International String Quartet Competition (BISQC) in Canada, will become the newest Peak Fellowship Ensembles-in-Residence at SMU Meadows School of the Arts, beginning in fall 2020.

SMU Meadows began a new collaboration with BISQC last year to offer the Peak residency prize to the competition’s first place laureate. The Viano and Marmen quartets will share the residency.

The jury selection of two winners was a first for BISQC, a program of Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity in Banff, Alberta, and one of the world’s leading music competitions. Founded in 1983 and held once every three years, BISQC invites 10 select quartets from around the globe to Banff Centre to perform various pieces of work over seven days, competing for the top prize: a three-year career development program worth over $300,000. In addition to the Meadows residency, the first place winners receive a cash award, concert tours throughout Europe and North America, and a Banff Centre residency that includes the production of a recording.

The Peak residency was established at SMU Meadows in 2015 as a multi-year fellowship available to chamber music groups internationally. The first two winners were the Cezanne Quartet (2015-17) and the Julius Quartet (2017-19). The fellowship includes an annual stipend; participation in master classes and workshops with visiting artists; extensive performance opportunities in Dallas; and more.

The fellowship was originally made possible by a generous gift from Martha Raley Peak (1927-2015), who earned a Bachelor of Music degree at SMU in 1950 and had a lifelong passion for the arts, particularly music. She regularly championed young musicians starting their careers. To ensure the continuation of the program and to honor her mother’s legacy, her daughter, Martha Peak Rochelle, has provided for an endowment gift of $2 million to SMU Meadows, as well as an additional $400,000 for operational funding.

“My mother was a devoted supporter of SMU and the Meadows School, and her gift to provide a residency for talented young ensembles at the University was truly from the heart,” said Rochelle, a 1976 graduate of SMU’s Dedman School of Law and a member of the Meadows School executive board. “Music was important to her throughout her life, and she always did her utmost to encourage others in the field. She would be thrilled to know that the Peak Fellowship will support the promising winners of a major international competition.”

The Peak Fellowship is overseen by award-winning violinist Aaron Boyd, a season artist of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and the director of chamber music at SMU Meadows.

“At a time when the arts are suffering worldwide due to the pandemic, we are especially grateful for this generous endowment gift, which will impact students and arts patrons for generations to come,” said Boyd. “We are looking forward to bringing the extraordinary Marmen and Viano quartets to Meadows as a result of our new collaboration with BISQC. Through the Peak Fellowship, we will be able to offer them an opportunity to hone critical skills in teaching, organizing, outreach and mentorship while giving them access to our faculty and facilities for lessons, coaching, collaborations and concerts. Previous winners of the BISQC competition have gone on to successful international careers. Our students and the entire Dallas community will benefit from the presence of these exceptionally talented musicians.”

Each quartet will present a yearly recital in Dallas and perform in several other chamber music concerts at SMU. Members will also coach student ensembles, offer private lessons and career workshops, give class demonstrations, and work with student composers, among other activities.

“What was already a wonderful opportunity for the SMU community has become even richer,” said Barry Shiffman, BISQC director. “Both the Marmen Quartet and Viano Quartet share a stunning level of artistry and commitment. Representing the best of the European and North American approaches to quartet performance, these winning quartets will bring incredible performances and interactions to SMU, demonstrating the enormous breadth of artistic possibility. We look forward to working closely with the Meadows School and appreciate their immediate support for this unprecedented joint first prize, allowing for the sharing of the Peak Fellowship Residency opportunities.”

About the Quartets:

Marmen Quartet: Founded in 2013 at the Royal College of Music, London, the Marmen Quartet includes Johannes Marmen and Ricky Gore (violin), Bryony Gibson-Cornish (viola) and Steffan Morris (cello). The group currently holds the Guildhall School of Music String Quartet Fellowship in London and serves as the Young Quartet in Residence at Wiltshire Music Centre. In addition to the BISQC competition, they have won the Grand Prize at the 2019 Bordeaux International String Quartet Competition, the 2018 Royal Over-Seas League Competition and Second Prize at the 8th International Joseph Joachim Chamber Music Competition, as well as the Special Prize for the best interpretation of a contemporary work (The Four Quarters by Thomas Adès). During 2015-17, they were the inaugural winners of Music in the Round’s “Bridge” Scheme in the U.K., which supported concerts, workshops and mentoring with the late Peter Cropper. For more information, visit marmenquartet.com.

Viano String Quartet: The Viano Quartet formed in 2015 at the Colburn Conservatory of Music in Los Angeles, where they are Ensemble-in-Residence through the 2020-21 season. Members include Lucy Wang and Hao Zhou (violin), Aiden Kane (viola) and Tate Zawadiuk (cello). The quartet received the Grand Prize at the 2019 ENKOR International Music Competition and second prize at the 2019 Yellow Springs Chamber Music Competition. At the 2018 Wigmore Hall International String Quartet Competition they received Third Prize, the Haydn Prize for the best performance of a Haydn quartet, and the Sidney Griller Award for the best performance of the compulsory work, Thomas Ades’ The Four Quarters. In addition, they received the Silver Medal at the 2018 Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition and Third Prize at the 9th Osaka International Chamber Music Competition in 2017. For more information, visit https://www.vianostringquartet.com

For more information about the Banff International String Quartet Competition, visit https://www.banffcentre.ca/bisqc.  For more information about the SMU Peak Fellowship Ensemble-in-Residence, visit https://www.smu.edu/Meadows/AreasOfStudy/Music/PeakFellowship.

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Christian Jesse
  

Meadows master’s thesis Magnificat & Nunc Dimittis wins top award in student choral short works division


Christian Jesse, who earned a Master of Music in composition at SMU Meadows School of the Arts in 2019, has won first place in the student choral division (short works) of The American Prize in Composition competition for 2019-20 for his work Magnificat & Nunc Dimittis

The American Prize was founded in 2009 and is awarded annually in many areas of the performing arts. The American Prize in Composition recognizes and rewards the best composers in America of works for orchestra, chorus, concert band, chamber ensemble, pops, or theater music (opera-musical theater, theater, film, dance) that have been read or publicly performed.  Winners receive cash prizes, certificates, written evaluations and regional, national and international recognition based on recorded performances. Winners are also profiled on The American Prize website. 

Magnificat & Nunc Dimittis was Jesse’s master’s thesis at SMU, written under the mentorship of Associate Professor of Composition and Theory Robert Frank. Scored for choir, organ, string quintet and percussion, the work takes its text from the Book of Common Prayer and is a nonliturgical concert setting of evensong canticles. The 16-minute piece was premiered in 2019 by the Meadows new music ensemble SYZYGY, under the direction of Dr. Lane Harder, lecturer in music theory and composition. 

“While Christian had composed other award-winning choral works in the past, this was his first attempt at including a larger ensemble along with the chorus,” said Dr. Frank. “The wonderful color palette of our Fisk organ in Caruth Auditorium inspired him to include organ for the first time as well. The result was nothing short of magical.”  

Another student of Dr. Frank, Olga Amelkina-Vera (M.M. ’17), won the same prestigious award two years ago.  “To have a second work from our program win this major national competition is a real confirmation of the high quality of our program and the talent and dedication of our students,” said Dr. Frank.  

“Writing Magnificat & Nunc Dimittis was a special and emotional journey for me,” said Jesse. “There were many difficult and exciting events happening for my family in the months leading up to the premiere. I wanted to pour my heart out onto this piece, to capture all the emotions I felt reading the first two chapters of Luke, well knowing that in a few months I was going to become a father to a baby boy. I am humbled to have received this award, and I am grateful that God put so many passionate and experienced mentors in my life to help cultivate and nurture this gift that God gave me.” 

Listen to the performance of Magnificat & Nunc Dimittis by SYZYGY and Meadows choral students.

 

About Christian Jesse 

Jesse received his M.M. in composition at Meadows in spring 2019. He earned a B.A. in music composition at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, where his awards included the 2016 Edna and Judson Loomis Prize in Music, and first place in both the 2016 Wisconsin Alliance for Composers’ Student Composer Competition (undergraduate division) and the 2017 Spring University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh Concerto Competition for Composition. While at SMU, he was named the Irving Symphony Orchestra 2018-19 Student Composer-in-Residence, premiering the work A Soldier’s Memory with the orchestra for its Veteran’s Day concert in 2018. He also won SMU’s 2019 Roy and Sue Johnson Award, given to a graduating student in any music field selected by vote of the entire music faculty for a combination of high standards in scholarship and artistry. With a passion for writing in all mediums, Jesse has composed works for various ensembles, musicians, video games and film. He continues to explore new sounds, techniques and genres as he works toward his dream career: composing for choir, orchestra and video games. For more information, visit www.christianjesse.com.

 

About The American Prize

The American Prize National Nonprofit Competitions in the Performing Arts grew from the belief that a great deal of excellent music being made in the U.S. goes unrecognized and unheralded, not only in  major cities, but all across the country: in schools and churches, in colleges and universities, and by community and professional musicians.

The American Prize seeks to fill the gap that leaves excellent artists and ensembles struggling for visibility and viability. It recognizes and rewards the best America produces, without bias against small city versus large, or unknown artist versus well known.

David Katz is the chief judge of The American Prize. Professional conductor, award-winning composer, playwright, actor and arts advocate, he is author of Muse of Fire, the acclaimed one-man play about the art of conducting. Joining Katz in selecting winners of The American Prize is a panel of judges of varied background and experience. Made up of distinguished musicians representing virtually every region of the country, the group includes professional vocalists, conductors, composers and pianists, tenured professors, and orchestra, band and choral musicians.

“Most artists may never win a Grammy award, or a Pulitzer, or a Tony, or perhaps ever even be nominated,” Katz said, “but that does not mean that they are not worthy of recognition and reward. Quality in the arts is not limited to the coasts, or to the familiar names, or only to graduates of a few schools. It is on view all over the United States, if you take the time to look for it. The American Prize exists to encourage and herald that excellence.”

The American Prize is administered by Hat City Music Theater, Inc., a 501(c)3 nonprofit performing arts organization based in Danbury, Connecticut. For more information, visit www.theamericanprize.org



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Alexander Sitkovetsky; photo by Vincy Ng
 
 

Alexander Sitkovetsky and Chad Hoopes to join

SMU Meadows School of the Arts in fall 2020

 

DALLAS (SMU) – Following an international search, renowned violinists Alexander Sitkovetsky and Chad Hoopes have been appointed to the faculty at Southern Methodist University’s Meadows School of the Arts in Dallas, Texas, beginning in fall 2020.

Sitkovetsky is an international concert artist who trained at the Yehudi Menuhin School in London and has performed as a guest soloist with dozens of major orchestras worldwide, including the Royal Philharmonic, Tokyo Symphony and Moscow Symphony. He is a critically acclaimed recording artist, recipient of the 2016 Lincoln Center Emerging Artist Award and a founding member of the award-winning Sitkovetsky Trio. He will serve as artist-in-residence at SMU.

Since winning first prize at the 2008 Yehudi Menuhin International Violin Competition, Chad Hoopes has established himself as an impressive and versatile artist, frequently performing with leading ensembles across the globe. He is a 2017 recipient of Lincoln Center’s Avery Fisher Career Grant, a member of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, and served as the Munich Symphony’s first artist-in-residence, a position created specifically for him after his acclaimed debut with the orchestra. Hoopes studied at the Cleveland Institute of Music and at the Kronberg Academy in Germany. He will serve as professor of practice at SMU.

“We are all excited about these new additions to our distinguished Music Division faculty,” said David Mancini, director of the division. “These hires demonstrate the division’s continuing commitment to the finest string instruction possible.”

At SMU, Sitkovetsky and Hoopes will teach individual students and conduct studio classes. They will also perform with students in semester-long chamber music workshops and present public recitals.

“I am delighted to be appointed artist-in-residence at the SMU Meadows School of the Arts,” said Sitkovetsky. “This is an incredible opportunity to contribute in many different facets to the musical fabric of this historical institution and world-class university. I look forward to working with my outstanding colleagues to enrich the cultural lives of the students and to continue to develop this renowned program.”

“I am thrilled to be joining the wonderful faculty at SMU Meadows, and look forward to sharing all of my experiences with the students and helping them achieve their goals!” said Hoopes.

For more information, visit the SMU Meadows Division of Music website. Full biographies of the artists follow.

 

ABOUT ALEXANDER SITKOVETSKY

Alexander Sitkovetsky was born in Moscow into a family with a well-established musical tradition. His concerto debut came at the age of eight, and in the same year he moved to the UK to study at the Yehudi Menuhin School. Lord Menuhin was his inspiration throughout his school years and they performed together on several occasions. 

Highlights of his recent concerto performances include appearances with the Yomiuri Nippon Symphony Orchestra, Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Munich Chamber Orchestra, Konzerthaus Orchester Berlin, Royal Northern Sinfonia, BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, Sinfonietta Riga, Lithuanian National Symphony Orchestra, Netherlands Philharmonic Orchestra, Tokyo Symphony Orchestra, European Union Chamber Orchestra, Halle Orchestra, Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, Moscow Symphony Orchestra, St. Petersburg Symphony Orchestra, Orquesta Filarmónica de Bolivia, National Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Russian State Philharmonic Orchestra, Residentie Orkest The Hague, Aarhus Symphony Orchestra, Welsh National Opera Orchestra, BBC National Orchestra of Wales, London Philharmonic Orchestra, Novosibirsk Symphony Orchestra, Philharmonia Orchestra, Arctic Philharmonic Chamber Orchestra and the Anhaltische Philharmonie Dessau. 

He is also much in demand as a director and has directed and performed as a soloist regularly with the Australian Chamber Orchestra, Norwegian Chamber Orchestra, Amsterdam Sinfonietta, London Mozart Players, Lithuanian Chamber Orchestra, New York Chamber Players, Camerata Zurich and the Arctic Philharmonic Chamber Orchestra. In addition, he is regularly invited to be a guest soloist with orchestras touring the UK, and these have recently included the Russian Philharmonic Novosibirsk, Brussels Philharmonic, St. Petersburg Symphony Orchestra and the Tonkünstler Orchester. 

His critically acclaimed CPO recording of Andrzej Panufnik’s Violin Concerto with the Konzerthaus Orchester Berlin commemorating the composer’s 100th birthday won an ICMA Special Achievement Award. His most recent recording with the English Symphony Orchestra of the Philip Sawyers Violin Concerto was released to great critical acclaim. 

Sitkovetsky was awarded first prize at the Trio di Trieste Duo Competition alongside pianist Wu Qian. He is an alumnus of the prestigious Chamber Music Society Two program at Lincoln Center, and in 2016 received the Lincoln Center Emerging Artist Award. 

Sitkovetsky is a founding member of the Sitkovetsky Trio, with whom he has won various prizes including the Mecklenburg-Vorpommern Kammermusik Prize. The trio has performed all over the UK and Europe, including Alte Oper Frankfurt, Concertgebouw Amsterdam and Wigmore Hall, and recently toured Asia. For more information, visit the artist’s website.

 

ABOUT CHAD HOOPES

Acclaimed by critics worldwide for his “jaw-dropping virtuosity” and magnificent tone, American violinist Chad Hoopes remains one of the most consistent and versatile artists of his generation. 

Highlights of recent seasons include performances with the China Philharmonic, the Philadelphia Orchestra, Vancouver Symphony, Orchestre de Paris, l’Orchestre National du Capitole de Toulouse and Konzerthausorchester Berlin. He has performed with leading orchestras including the San Francisco, Pittsburgh and Houston symphonies, as well as the Cleveland Orchestra, Minnesota Orchestra, Colorado Music Festival Orchestra, the National Symphony Orchestra and the National Arts Centre Orchestra. As an alumnus of the Bowers Program, Hoopes frequently performs with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center both on their tours and at Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall. He has performed recitals at the Ravinia Festival, the Tonhalle Zürich, the Louvre, the Kennedy Center and on Lincoln Center’s Great Performers Series. 

Hoopes’ recordings include the Mendelssohn and Adams concertos with the MDR Leipzig Radio Symphony Orchestra, several on the Music@Menlo Live label, and as part of the complete volume of Bernstein’s Piano and Chamber Music, produced by the WDR Cologne. 

Hoopes is a frequent guest artist at the Menuhin Festival in Gstaad, Switzerland, the Rheingau Festival, and at Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, where he was named winner of the prestigious Audience Award. He served as the Munich Symphony Orchestra’s first artist-in-residence, a position created specifically for him after his highly acclaimed debut with the orchestra. 

Born in Florida, Hoopes began his violin studies at the age of three in Minneapolis, and continued his training at the Cleveland Institute of Music with David Cerone. He studied at the Kronberg Academy under the guidance of Professor Ana Chumachenco, who remains his mentor. Hoopes is a 2017 recipient of the Avery Fisher Career Grant and won first prize at the 2008 Yehudi Menuhin International Violin Competition. He plays the 1991 Samuel Zygmuntowicz violin formerly owned by Isaac Stern. For more information, visit the artist’s website.  

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Silas Farley in "Songs from the Spirit"
 
 

One-Year Dance Residency Funded by

Liz Martin Armstrong ’82 and Bill Armstrong ’82

 

Farley to teach advanced levels of ballet, pointe and classical partnering

 

DALLAS (SMU) --- The Division of Dance at SMU Meadows School of the Arts has announced that acclaimed dancer and choreographer Silas Farley, who retired from New York City Ballet in May after eight years with the company, will be the Armstrong Visiting Artist-in-Residence in Ballet at Meadows for the 2020-21 school year. 

The one-year appointment for the visiting ballet artist was made possible by a gift from SMU Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences alumni Liz Martin Armstrong ’82 and Bill Armstrong ’82. 

A national dance star who has been profiled in The New York Times, Dance Magazine, The New Yorker and Vogue, Farley joined New York City Ballet (NYCB) in 2012 and danced with the company until 2020, performing principal roles in the works of George Balanchine and Christopher Wheeldon and originating roles in ballets by Wheeldon, Lauren Lovette and Justin Peck. In addition to teaching at SMU Meadows, he is a guest teacher at The School of American Ballet (SAB), which is the official school of NYCB, and has also guest taught with companies around the globe. A choreographer since age 11, Farley has created ballets for SAB, Ballet Academy East, The New York Choreographic Institute, and Columbia Ballet Collaborative at Columbia University. In summer 2017, he served as the choreographer for the Practicing Silence workshop at Grace Farms Foundation in New Canaan, Conn. For this, he collaborated with poet Ilya Kaminsky on a ballet adaptation of Kaminsky’s National Book Award-winning work, Deaf Republic. In fall 2017, Farley was commissioned by MetLiveArts to create a new site-specific ballet, Songs from the Spirit, which premiered in March 2019 at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. In spring 2020, he was commissioned by the performing arts series Works & Process at the Guggenheim Museum to choreograph for its Virtual Commissions initiative. In addition, The Washington Ballet has commissioned Farley to choreograph a new ballet for its 2020-21 season. 

Farley was an inaugural Jerome Robbins Dance Division Research Fellow at The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts (NYPL-LPA), where his research earned him Lincoln Center’s 2015 Martin E. Segal Award. He has lectured extensively on ballet and is the writer and host of “Hear the Dance,” a regular program on City Ballet The Podcast. He is an alumnus/trustee of Professional Children’s School in New York and a member of the board of directors of The George Balanchine Foundation. 

At SMU, Farley will teach advanced levels of ballet, pointe, and classical partnering, as well as a module on George Balanchine for a dance history class. In addition, he will choreograph a new work for a Meadows dance concert. 

“We are thrilled to welcome Silas Farley as a visiting artist this year, and grateful to the Armstrongs for making it possible,” said Christopher Dolder, chair of the Meadows Division of Dance. “At SMU we have a rich tradition of teaching foundational dance techniques, notably those of Martha Graham and George Balanchine. Our associate professor Leslie Peck was a member of New York City Ballet under George Balanchine and is an official stager of Balanchine ballets for The George Balanchine Trust. The Armstrongs’ gift recognizes and continues the Balanchine legacy at SMU by helping us bring Farley, a skilled exponent of the performance tradition, technical teaching, and academic scholarship of Balanchine’s work, to Meadows.”  

The Armstrongs have been major supporters of ballet and the Balanchine legacy. Liz Armstrong is the former chair of the board of Colorado Ballet and currently serves on both the advisory council and board of directors of The School of American Ballet. The Armstrongs are also passionate supporters and leaders of their alma mater. Bill Armstrong serves on SMU’s board of trustees and Liz Armstrong serves on the executive board of Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. Their past contributions to SMU include gifts for the Armstrong Residential Commons and Armstrong Fieldhouse, part of the SMU Mustangs Indoor Performance Center.  

“We are thrilled to fund this position in Meadows’ Division of Dance for the coming year, as it combines our love for SMU and passion for ballet,” said Liz Armstrong. “We are excited that students in Dallas will have the opportunity to study under Silas Farley, one of the most talented dancers and choreographers of today’s generation.” 

The SMU Meadows Division of Dance offers professional dance training within the context of a comprehensive liberal arts education, and consistently ranks among the top dance programs in the country. For more information, visit the department’s website.

 

 

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"From the OTHER Side" by Mark Burrell.jpg
 
 

Featuring premieres by jazz artist Mark Burrell and San Francisco

choreographer Joe Goode and an acclaimed work by Adam Hougland

 

Three exciting contemporary works, including two world premieres by SMU Jazz Artist-in-Residence Mark Burrell and San Francisco Bay Area choreographer Joe Goode and the revival of an acclaimed work by award-winning artist Adam Hougland, will be presented at SMU Meadows School of the Arts’ Spring Dance Concert, March 11-15 in the Bob Hope Theatre at SMU.

The concert opens with the premiere of Joe Goode’s Notes on Becoming. A Guggenheim Fellowship recipient, Goode is a choreographer, writer and director widely known as an innovator in the field of dance for his willingness to combine movement with spoken word, song and imagery. His Joe Goode Performance Group, founded in 1986, has toured the world with a mission of promoting understanding and compassion through dance and theater.

Next on the program is the haunting and disturbing Cripple and the Starfish (2014) by nationally acclaimed choreographer Adam Hougland. Set to a quintet of orchestral pop songs by the group Antony and the Johnsons, this enigmatic and powerfully visceral work is, in the words of Tulsa World dance critic Jim Watts, “One of the most emotionally shattering experiences I’ve had in a theater.” Hougland, whose honors include the Princess Grace Award for Choreography, is resident choreographer for the Cincinnati Ballet and principal choreographer for the Louisville Ballet, and has created works for major companies in the U.S., Canada and Europe.

The concert concludes with the premiere of Mark Burrell’s From the OTHER Side. The work explores spatial architecture, seductive innuendo and virtuosic athleticism while exposing the human narratives of tolerance, deception and illusion. Burrell, a veteran of the Broadway stage who performed in Pippin, Cats and Fosse, is a supporter of numerous human rights groups and said he hopes the work will help engender conversations surrounding the LGBTQ+ community on acceptance and inclusivity in contemporary society.

The Spring Dance Concert takes place in the Bob Hope Theatre in SMU’s Owen Arts Center, 6101 Bishop Blvd., Dallas 75205. Performance times are 8 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $14 for adults, $11 for seniors and $8 for students, SMU faculty and staff. Free parking is available in the Meadows School parking lot at Hillcrest and Binkley or in the garage under the Meadows Museum. For more information or to purchase tickets, call 214-768-2787.

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Event to honor philanthropist, arts advocate and alumna Emily Rich Summers

 

DALLAS (SMU) – SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts will present its 27th annual “Meadows at the Meyerson” concert at 8 p.m. Tuesday, March 10 in the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, 2301 Flora St. in Dallas. The event will feature works focused on stories and legends by Sibelius and Rimsky-Korsakov, performed by the critically acclaimed Meadows Symphony Orchestra under the direction of conductor Paul Phillips. The event supports talented Meadows students through the Meadows Scholars Program.

The annual spring concert also honors a community leader. This year, the honoree is noted designer, arts advocate and alumna Emily Rich Summers. The honorary chairs are Craig and Kathryn Hall, and the event chairs are Nita Prothro Clark and Suzanne Perot McGee. SMU President R. Gerald Turner and Algur H. Meadows Dean Sam Holland will provide remarks at the event.

The concert opens with a nine-minute work by Jean Sibelius, The Swan of Tuonela, one of four tone poems by the composer based on Finnish mythology. The beautiful, moody music evokes Tuonela, the land of death, where a mystical swan floats majestically on the river, singing, then fading into the distance.

The MSO then performs what is considered Rimsky-Korsakov’s most famous work, Scheherazade, based on tales of The Arabian Nights. The four movements evoke the sea and Sinbad the sailor; the fantastic narrative of the Prince Kalandar, a wandering mystic; the love story of a prince and a princess; and a Baghdad festival and shipwreck. The composer wrote, “All I had desired was that the hearer…should carry away the impression that it is beyond doubt an oriental narrative of some numerous and varied fairy-tale wonders and not merely four pieces played one after the other.” Enduringly popular with both audiences and critics, the work has been called “an exhilarating journey of love, intrigue and adventure” and “one of the most colorful, evocative and descriptive scores in all classical music.” (Classic FM)

“Meadows at the Meyerson is the highlight of our performance season in the community,” said Samuel Holland, Algur H. Meadows Dean of the Meadows School. “We are proud to share the talents of the incomparable Meadows Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Maestro Paul Phillips. We are grateful for the support this concert provides for the Meadows Scholars Program, and we see its impact every day in rising academics, artistry and diversity. It is a particular joy to recognize our alumna, the internationally celebrated designer Emily Summers.”

Event honoree Emily Rich Summers is the principal and owner of a nationally recognized residential and commercial interior design and interior architecture firm, Emily Summers Design Associates. She earned a B.F.A. in fine art at SMU in 1966 and continued graduate coursework at Meadows in art history from 1975 to 1980. Summers began her career in interior design in 1979. Today her firm is well known for its integration of interior design, interior architecture and art consultation.                                                                                    

From 2007 to 2017, Summers was listed in Architectural Digest’s AD100 directory of the world’s top 100 designers and architects. She is a founding member and past president of the Dallas Architectural Forum and has 40 years of involvement with the Dallas Museum of Art. She currently sits on the board of the Trinity Park Conservancy and is a lifetime member of the UT-Austin School of Architecture Advisory Council. President George W. Bush appointed Summers to the national Advisory Council on Historic Preservation from 2002 to 2006. As a member of the Meadows School executive board, she is consulting on the current renovation of the Owen Arts Center. In 2015, Summers’ son and daughter-in-law, Stephen and Elisa Summers, established The Emily Rich Summers Endowed Professorship of Art History in her name. The professorship is currently held by department chair and Guggenheim fellow Adam Herring, Ph.D.

The Meadows Scholars Program: Bringing the best and brightest to Dallas

The annual Meadows at the Meyerson concert provides important funding for the Meadows Scholars Program, inaugurated in 2008 to recruit the brightest and most talented students nationwide to the Meadows School of the Arts. It is targeted to applicants who are accepted to Meadows and who meet both stringent academic and artistic/leadership criteria. While such high achievers often receive SMU academic scholarship awards, many of them are still unable to afford full tuition. The Meadows Scholars Program offers an additional annual scholarship, plus an exploration grant that can be used any time during their years at Meadows for a creative project, providing a significant incentive for them to choose SMU and Dallas. Now in its twelfth year, the program has supported the academic careers of more than 200 students.

Ticket and sponsorship information

Tickets to the Meadows at the Meyerson concert are $25 for adults, $20 for seniors, and $17 for students and SMU faculty and staff. A $10 discount is available for Meadows subscribers. For tickets, contact the Meadows box office at 214-768-2787.

Patron and corporate sponsorships with special benefits and premium seating packages are available from $2,500 to $15,000.  In addition, Meadows recognizes those who either permanently endow a Meadows Scholar at $150,000 or who make a $30,000 commitment to fund a scholarship over four years. For more information, call the Meadows Development Office at 214-768-4189, email meadowsgiving@smu.edu, or visit smu.edu/meyerson.

 

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Concert will feature seven new works and alumni performers from around the country

 

The Meadows Percussion Ensemble at SMU Meadows School of the Arts will present its first alumni concert to honor Doug Howard, who founded the ensemble in 1975 and recently retired after more than 40 years of teaching percussion at Meadows. The concert takes place at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, September 22 in Caruth Auditorium of the Owen Arts Center, 6101 Bishop Blvd. on the SMU campus. Admission is FREE and no tickets are required. Parking is available at Hillcrest and Binkley and in the garage beneath the Meadows Museum (enter museum garage through left gate only). For more information, please call the Meadows box office at 214.768.2787.

Under the direction of Jon Lee, the concert will feature 10 works, including the premiere of seven new pieces composed for the occasion by percussion/composition alumni and colleagues. More than 40 Percussion Ensemble alumni from around the country will return to Meadows for the concert, many of whom will perform on stage with the students.

New alumni works to be presented include I’ll Be Bringing the Bagels by Brandon Carson, The Lineage by Del Cook, Prospect by Alex Shawver, Vines Don’t Reach by Eden Porter and The Mental Manacles of the Rhythmically Divine by Jesus J. Martinez.

Also premiering will be The Titanic Days by Christopher Deane, associate professor of percussion at University of North Texas, and Cannonade by Dr. Lane Harder, alumnus, Meadows faculty member and director of the Meadows SYZYGY ensemble. Cannonade will feature all 40-plus returning alumni performing with current Meadows Percussion Ensemble members.

The ensemble will also present Weapon Wheel, a work by Quinn Mason, visiting composition/percussion student at Meadows.

Two additional works will be conducted by former Meadows faculty who are making special appearances at the concert. Quatrefoil by alumnus Justin Preece will be conducted by former Meadows associate dean Robert Stroker, who is now dean of the School of Music at Temple University. Toccata by Carlos Chavez will be conducted by Deborah Mashburn, former director of the Meadows Percussion Ensemble.

Honoree Doug Howard served as both adjunct professor of percussion at SMU and principal percussionist at the Dallas Symphony Orchestra from 1975 until his retirement in 2018. Howard founded the Meadows Percussion Ensemble in his first year at SMU, and spent decades teaching his students the technique and repertoire for becoming a symphonic percussionist.

“Doug’s former students and Percussion Ensemble members have gone on to distinguish themselves as musicians, professors and entrepreneurs around the world, and we are thrilled to welcome many of them back to campus for our first-ever alumni concert,” said ensemble director Jon Lee. “In his 43 years at SMU, Doug influenced and mentored hundreds and hundreds of talented students. As Meadows celebrates its 50th anniversary, it is fitting that we honor a faculty member who has been a respected and admired professor at Meadows for almost that entire time.”

About the Meadows Percussion Ensemble

Founded in 1975 by Doug Howard, the SMU Meadows Percussion Ensemble, under the direction of Jon D. Lee, consists of 13 undergraduate and graduate percussion students in the Division of Music at SMU Meadows School of the Arts. The ensemble has performed at a number of national and international conferences, including those for the Texas Music Educators Association, Percussive Arts Society and World Association of Symphonic Bands and Ensembles. The ensemble is dedicated to the performance of new and traditional percussion ensemble literature. It has premiered works by noted composers including Warren Benson’s Drums of Summer, Stephen Jones’ strike 2, Robert Xavier Rodriguez’s Xochiquetzal and many others. The ensemble has recorded two CDs on the Gasparo label, Strike: the Music of Motion and Contact.

 
 
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New works by noted choreographers Takehiro Ueyama, Alexander Sanchez and Dwight Rhoden are set to well-known 20th-century music

 

Event celebrates Meadows’ 50th anniversary and honors The Meadows Foundation

 

DALLAS (SMU) – SMU Meadows School of the Arts will present three premieres by internationally recognized choreographers at its 26th annual benefit concert, “Meadows at the Winspear,” at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 4 in the Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House, 2403 Flora St. in Dallas. The concert will feature the critically acclaimed Meadows Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of conductor Paul Phillips, and the students of the Meadows Dance Ensemble performing three new works, each set to well-known 20th-century music. The works include Takehiro Ueyama’s ethereal Heroes, set to John Adams’ The Chairman Dances; Broadway choreographer Alexander Sanchez’s lively interpretation of George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue; and Dwight Rhoden’s vibrant ballet Stellar Matter, set to an orchestral suite from Gustav Holst’s The Planets.

The annual spring concert raises funds to support talented Meadows students through the Meadows Scholars Program. It also honors a community leader, and this year, the honoree is The Meadows Foundation, which has supported SMU and Dallas for more than five decades. The event also kicks off the school’s 50th anniversary celebration; it was in 1969 that SMU’s School of the Arts was renamed Meadows School of the Arts in honor of Algur H. Meadows. The honorary chairs are Linda and Bill Custard, and the event chair is Stacey McCord. SMU President R. Gerald Turner and Algur H. Meadows Dean Samuel Holland will provide remarks at the event.

The concert opens with Ueyama’s Heroes, a work for 12 dancers, including guest artist and alumnus Albert Drake, that combines powerful athleticism and delicate gestures drawn from the choreographer’s Japanese heritage. It is set to composer John Adams’ 1985 work The Chairman Dances, an imagined foxtrot for Chairman Mao Tse-Tung and his bride, Chiang Ch’ing, which Adams called a warmup to his opera Nixon in China. Ueyama, a former Paul Taylor dancer, has created a piece that he said honors the dedication and perseverance of citizens who played a crucial role in Japan’s recovery after World War II and are driving its success today. Ueyama has won multiple awards for his choreography, which has been inspired by the beauty in nature, the duality of darkness and light in the universal human condition and the humanity and compassion in day-to-day living.

The program continues with A Rhapsody in Blue, set to George Gershwin’s famous 1924 composition combining jazz rhythms and classical music. Award-winning choreographer Alexander Sanchez, known for his work both on and off Broadway, has created a new group work that follows the narrative of two young immigrants arriving in New York in the 1920s to pursue the American dream. Sanchez, who has directed and choreographed for numerous New York and regional theaters, was named one of Dance Magazine’s “25 artists to watch” in 2016 and has been praised by critics for works that are “whimsical,” “spectacular” and “wildly ingenious.” 

Concluding the program is Stellar Matter by Dwight Rhoden, co-founder and co-artistic director of New York City-based Complexions Contemporary Ballet, set to three of the seven movements from Gustav Holst’s The Planets – Mars, Uranus and Jupiter (1914-16). Holst said the pieces were suggested by the astrological significance of the planets. Rhoden has created an abstract interpretation of the composition, describing it as combining “the power and strength of Mars, the illusion and deception of Uranus, and the vibrancy and liveliness of Jupiter.” Complexions Contemporary Ballet has received numerous awards, including The New York Times Critics’ Choice Award, and has toured the globe. Celebrated for his choreography and wide-ranging collaborations with well-known dance artists, Rhoden has created over 80 ballets for Complexions and for numerous other major companies, earning distinction from The New York Times as “one of the most sought-out choreographers of the day.”

“Meadows at the Winspear is the pinnacle of our performance season,” said Samuel Holland, dean of the Meadows School. “We are thrilled to share the talents of our gifted dance and music students in world premieres by these three extraordinary choreographers. We are grateful for the support this concert provides for the Meadows Scholars Program, the impact of which can be measured by rising academic achievement, artistry and diversity with each incoming class. We are especially proud this year to commemorate our 50th anniversary and to celebrate the civic and cultural contributions of The Meadows Foundation to SMU and to Dallas.”

 

The Meadows Foundation: Supporting SMU and Dallas since 1948

The Meadows Foundationis a private philanthropic institution established in 1948 by Algur H. and Virginia Meadows from wealth accumulated through the General American Oil Company, once among the largest private oil and gas companies in the United States. The Foundation exists to assist people and institutions of Texas to improve the quality and circumstances of life for themselves and future generations. The Foundation strives to exemplify the principles of its founder in addressing basic human needs; protecting the environment; providing cultural enrichment; encouraging excellence; and promoting understanding and cooperation among people. Since its inception, the Foundation has disbursed more than $1.2 billion in grants and direct charitable expenditures to more than 3,500 Texas institutions and agencies. The Meadows Foundation grants funds in the areas of arts and culture, civic and public affairs, education, health and human services.

The Meadows Foundation traces its historic partnership with SMU back to the early 1960s, when Algur Meadows, an avid art collector, donated his Spanish art collection to SMU in honor of Virginia after her passing, along with a $1 million endowment to create the Virginia Meadows Museum within the Owen Arts Center. Mr. Meadows later donated his collection of sculptures by contemporary Italian artists to SMU to establish the Elizabeth Meadows Sculpture Garden, named in honor of his second wife. The museum and garden opened in the Owen Arts Center in 1965. He also gave a $10 million gift to the SMU School of the Arts, and in gratitude, the SMU Board of Trustees renamed the school Meadows School of the Arts in 1969.

The Meadows Foundation has continued its generous support of initiatives and causes across SMU over the decades, and in 2015 announced a gift of $45 million to the Meadows School and the Meadows Museum – the largest single gift in SMU’s history. The momentous gift made the Foundation the only entity to provide SMU more than $100 million in financial resources to a singular area of focus: the education and promotion of the arts.

 

The Meadows Scholars Program: Bringing the best and brightest to Dallas

The annual Meadows at the Winspear concert provides important funding for the Meadows Scholars Program, inaugurated in 2008 to recruit the brightest and most talented students nationwide to the Meadows School of the Arts. It is targeted to applicants who are accepted to Meadows and who meet both stringent academic and artistic/leadership criteria. While such high achievers often receive SMU academic scholarship awards, many of them are still unable to afford full tuition. The Meadows Scholars Program offers an additional annual scholarship, plus an exploration grant that can be used any time during their years at Meadows for a creative project, providing a significant incentive for them to choose SMU and Dallas. Now in its eleventh year, the program has supported the academic careers of more than 200 students.

Ticket and sponsorship information

Tickets to the Meadows at the Winspear concert are $25 for adults, $20 for seniors, and $17 for students and SMU faculty and staff. A $10 discount is available for Meadows subscribers. For subscriber tickets, contact the Meadows box office at 214-768-2787. For general tickets, visit TicketDFW.com or call 214-871-5000. For additional information, visit smu.edu/winspear.

Patron and corporate sponsorships with special benefits and seating packages are available from $2,500 to $15,000.  In addition, Meadows recognizes those who either permanently endow a Meadows Scholar at $150,000 or who make a $30,000 commitment to fund a scholarship over four years. For more information, call the Meadows Development Office at 214-768-4189.

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New works by noted choreographers Takehiro Ueyama, Alexander Sanchez and Dwight Rhoden are set to well-known 20th-century music

 

Event celebrates Meadows’ 50th anniversary and honors The Meadows Foundation

 

DALLAS (SMU) – SMU Meadows School of the Arts will present three premieres by internationally recognized choreographers at its 26th annual benefit concert, “Meadows at the Winspear,” at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 4 in the Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House, 2403 Flora St. in Dallas. The concert will feature the critically acclaimed Meadows Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of conductor Paul Phillips, and the students of the Meadows Dance Ensemble performing three new works, each set to well-known 20th-century music. The works include Takehiro Ueyama’s ethereal Heroes, set to John Adams’ The Chairman Dances; Broadway choreographer Alexander Sanchez’s lively interpretation of George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue; and Dwight Rhoden’s vibrant ballet Stellar Matter, set to an orchestral suite from Gustav Holst’s The Planets.

The annual spring concert raises funds to support talented Meadows students through the Meadows Scholars Program. It also honors a community leader, and this year, the honoree is The Meadows Foundation, which has supported SMU and Dallas for more than five decades. The event also kicks off the school’s 50th anniversary celebration; it was in 1969 that SMU’s School of the Arts was renamed Meadows School of the Arts in honor of Algur H. Meadows. The honorary chairs are Linda and Bill Custard, and the event chair is Stacey McCord. SMU President R. Gerald Turner and Algur H. Meadows Dean Samuel Holland will provide remarks at the event.

The concert opens with Ueyama’s Heroes, a work for 12 dancers, including guest artist and alumnus Albert Drake, that combines powerful athleticism and delicate gestures drawn from the choreographer’s Japanese heritage. It is set to composer John Adams’ 1985 work The Chairman Dances, an imagined foxtrot for Chairman Mao Tse-Tung and his bride, Chiang Ch’ing, which Adams called a warmup to his opera Nixon in China. Ueyama, a former Paul Taylor dancer, has created a piece that he said honors the dedication and perseverance of citizens who played a crucial role in Japan’s recovery after World War II and are driving its success today. Ueyama has won multiple awards for his choreography, which has been inspired by the beauty in nature, the duality of darkness and light in the universal human condition and the humanity and compassion in day-to-day living.

The program continues with A Rhapsody in Blue, set to George Gershwin’s famous 1924 composition combining jazz rhythms and classical music. Award-winning choreographer Alexander Sanchez, known for his work both on and off Broadway, has created a new group work that follows the narrative of two young immigrants arriving in New York in the 1920s to pursue the American dream. Sanchez, who has directed and choreographed for numerous New York and regional theaters, was named one of Dance Magazine’s “25 artists to watch” in 2016 and has been praised by critics for works that are “whimsical,” “spectacular” and “wildly ingenious.” 

Concluding the program is Stellar Matter by Dwight Rhoden, co-founder and co-artistic director of New York City-based Complexions Contemporary Ballet, set to three of the seven movements from Gustav Holst’s The Planets – Mars, Uranus and Jupiter (1914-16). Holst said the pieces were suggested by the astrological significance of the planets. Rhoden has created an abstract interpretation of the composition, describing it as combining “the power and strength of Mars, the illusion and deception of Uranus, and the vibrancy and liveliness of Jupiter.” Complexions Contemporary Ballet has received numerous awards, including The New York Times Critics’ Choice Award, and has toured the globe. Celebrated for his choreography and wide-ranging collaborations with well-known dance artists, Rhoden has created over 80 ballets for Complexions and for numerous other major companies, earning distinction from The New York Times as “one of the most sought-out choreographers of the day.”

“Meadows at the Winspear is the pinnacle of our performance season,” said Samuel Holland, dean of the Meadows School. “We are thrilled to share the talents of our gifted dance and music students in world premieres by these three extraordinary choreographers. We are grateful for the support this concert provides for the Meadows Scholars Program, the impact of which can be measured by rising academic achievement, artistry and diversity with each incoming class. We are especially proud this year to commemorate our 50th anniversary and to celebrate the civic and cultural contributions of The Meadows Foundation to SMU and to Dallas.”

 

The Meadows Foundation: Supporting SMU and Dallas since 1948

The Meadows Foundation is a private philanthropic institution established in 1948 by Algur H. and Virginia Meadows from wealth accumulated through the General American Oil Company, once among the largest private oil and gas companies in the United States. The Foundation exists to assist people and institutions of Texas to improve the quality and circumstances of life for themselves and future generations. The Foundation strives to exemplify the principles of its founder in addressing basic human needs; protecting the environment; providing cultural enrichment; encouraging excellence; and promoting understanding and cooperation among people. Since its inception, the Foundation has disbursed more than $1.2 billion in grants and direct charitable expenditures to more than 3,500 Texas institutions and agencies. The Meadows Foundation grants funds in the areas of arts and culture, civic and public affairs, education, health and human services.

The Meadows Foundation traces its historic partnership with SMU back to the early 1960s, when Algur Meadows, an avid art collector, donated his Spanish art collection to SMU in honor of Virginia after her passing, along with a $1 million endowment to create the Virginia Meadows Museum within the Owen Arts Center. Mr. Meadows later donated his collection of sculptures by contemporary Italian artists to SMU to establish the Elizabeth Meadows Sculpture Garden, named in honor of his second wife. The museum and garden opened in the Owen Arts Center in 1965. He also gave a $10 million gift to the SMU School of the Arts, and in gratitude, the SMU Board of Trustees renamed the school Meadows School of the Arts in 1969.

The Meadows Foundation has continued its generous support of initiatives and causes across SMU over the decades, and in 2015 announced a gift of $45 million to the Meadows School and the Meadows Museum – the largest single gift in SMU’s history. The momentous gift made the Foundation the only entity to provide SMU more than $100 million in financial resources to a singular area of focus: the education and promotion of the arts.

 

The Meadows Scholars Program: Bringing the best and brightest to Dallas

The annual Meadows at the Winspear concert provides important funding for the Meadows Scholars Program, inaugurated in 2008 to recruit the brightest and most talented students nationwide to the Meadows School of the Arts. It is targeted to applicants who are accepted to Meadows and who meet both stringent academic and artistic/leadership criteria. While such high achievers often receive SMU academic scholarship awards, many of them are still unable to afford full tuition. The Meadows Scholars Program offers an additional annual scholarship, plus an exploration grant that can be used any time during their years at Meadows for a creative project, providing a significant incentive for them to choose SMU and Dallas. Now in its eleventh year, the program has supported the academic careers of more than 200 students.

Ticket and sponsorship information

Tickets to the Meadows at the Winspear concert are $25 for adults, $20 for seniors, and $17 for students and SMU faculty and staff. A $10 discount is available for Meadows subscribers. For subscriber tickets, contact the Meadows box office at 214-768-2787. For general tickets, visit TicketDFW.com or call 214-871-5000. For additional information, visit smu.edu/winspear.

Patron and corporate sponsorships with special benefits and seating packages are available from $2,500 to $15,000.  In addition, Meadows recognizes those who either permanently endow a Meadows Scholar at $150,000 or who make a $30,000 commitment to fund a scholarship over four years. For more information, call the Meadows Development Office at 214-768-4189.