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SMU Meadows School of the Arts Theatre Division presents Anton Chekhov's "A Cherry Orchard" beginning Wednesday, November 30th running through December 2nd. 
 
"A Cherry Orchard" is Chekhov's final play, considered a modern masterpiece. Madame Ranevskaya returns to her family's estate in the Russian countryside just as the estate may be sold to pay for debts. Selling their famous cherry orchard would rescue the estate - will it be done? Chekhov's comedy centers around frustrated love, identity, class, just-missed opportunities, and a group of delightful, contradictory characters to examine the nature of social change and the human struggle for happiness. 
 
Showtimes are:
Wednesday, November 28 at 8 PM
Thursday, November 29 at 8 PM
Friday, November 30 at 8 PM
Saturday, December 1 at 2 PM & 8 PM
Sunday, December 2 at 2 PM
 
For more information, call 214.768.2787 or check out the play's trailer here
 

 
Lee Gleiser
Event Marketing Manager
SMU Meadows School of the Arts
 
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SMU Music Composition Graduate Student Christian Jesse

Named Student Composer-in-Residence with Irving Symphony

 

Irving Symphony will premiere his new work, A Soldier’s Memory,

on Veterans Day tribute concert, November 3, 2018

 

Christian Jesse, a second-year master’s student in the music composition program at SMU Meadows School of the Arts, has been named the Student Composer-in-Residence with the Irving Symphony Orchestra for its 2018-19 season.

Launched in 2011, the Student Composer-in-Residence program is a unique partnership between SMU Meadows and the Irving Symphony Orchestra (ISO). Each year, an undergraduate or graduate Meadows music composition student is selected to serve as a composer-in-residence with the orchestra and to create a commissioned work to be premiered by the ISO. It is the only known program of its kind between a professional orchestra and a university music department.

Jesse’s work, A Soldier’s Memory, will premiere at the ISO’s concert on November 3. It was commissioned to fit with the concert theme, “An Evening at the Movies and a Tribute to Veterans Day.”

“I come from a family of veterans, and with this opportunity I wanted to express my love and support for the military and contribute in my own way to my family’s military legacy,” said Jesse. “The work deals with different emotions and thoughts that returning soldiers have as they come home from deployment – from thoughts of heroism to the special moments of being reunited with their loved ones, and even moments of PTSD flashbacks. While there are aspects of celebration within the piece, overall I want to tell a more realistic story of a soldier’s journey. I couldn’t be more excited to be part of this concert!” 

An annual competition to select the student composer-in-residence is held by a committee composed of two members of the SMU composition faculty and ISO Music Director Hector Guzman, who earned a Master of Music in instrumental conducting at SMU in 1983. Faculty select three finalists who show the greatest potential, have demonstrated ability to score for orchestra, and have the maturity and work ethic to successfully complete the residency. Maestro Guzman then makes the final selection of the student he feels would be the best fit with the ISO’s repertoire and audience.

In addition to working closely with Maestro Guzman, Jesse will participate in ISO educational outreach programs and other orchestra activities as part of his residency.

“Being selected for this residency was an incredible honor, especially knowing the amount of talent and creativity in our composition department,” said Jesse. “I have learned so much under the tutelage of Dr. Robert Frank, the professor I’m working closely with on this project and my thesis. We share many of the same interests and his knowledge of many different film scoring techniques was able to help me grow within this piece and overall as a composer. I am very excited to be working with Maestro Guzman to learn more about the internal workings of an orchestra and to see how I can best contribute to a professional performing arts organization.” 

“Christian’s music has always shown a direct emotional connection with his audiences, and with his family background including a number of veterans, this project seemed ideally suited to his talents,” said Dr. Frank, associate professor of composition at SMU Meadows. “It is exciting to be able to give our top students real-world professional experience via this opportunity, one that few professional composers are ever able to have. Christian has creativity and skills along with the strong work ethic that point towards a successful career as a composer, and I am thrilled to be mentoring him.”  

Jesse will receive his M.M. in composition at Meadows in spring 2019. He earned a B.A. in music composition at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, where his awards included the 2016 Edna and Judson Loomis Prize in Music, and first place in the 2016 Wisconsin Alliance for Composers’ Student Composer Competition (undergraduate division) and the 2017 Spring University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh Concerto Competition for Composition. With a passion for writing in all mediums, he has composed works for various ensembles, musicians, video games and film. He continues to explore new sounds, techniques and genres as he works toward his dream career: composing for film and video games. 

Jesse is the sixth SMU student selected for the ISO Student Composer-in-Residence program. The first was Vince Gover, whose “Let Us Begin Anew…” (a quote from John F. Kennedy’s inaugural speech) premiered in November 2011 at an ISO concert honoring the 50th anniversary of Kennedy’s inauguration. Succeeding winners included Alvin Trotman, who premiered Jubilee in November 2012; Jesus J. Martinez, whose Harmonic Tremor was performed in February 2014; and Michael van der Sloot, whose work Cascade was presented in March 2016. Last year’s winner, Olga Amelkina-Vera, developed her award-winning guitar quartet piece Cattywampus Rompus (Texas Tarantella) into an orchestral work premiered by the ISO in April 2017.

The Irving Symphony Orchestra is a professional orchestra that provides signature performances for North Texas and regularly features renowned guest artists. Under the music direction of Maestro Guzman, it annually presents six concerts in its subscription season, four multi-media free youth concerts for more than 6,000 Irving middle school students, and free family, community and educational events. In addition to Jesse’s work, the November 3 concert will feature a Veteran’s Day celebration and music from such movie classics as Star Wars, The Magnificent Seven, The Patriot and more. For tickets and more information about the ISO’s 2018-19 season, visit www.irvingsymphony.com.

 

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SMU Music Composition Graduate Student Christian Jesse

Named Student Composer-in-Residence with Irving Symphony

 

Irving Symphony will premiere his new work, A Soldier’s Memory,

on Veterans Day tribute concert, November 3, 2018

 

Christian Jesse, a second-year master’s student in the music composition program at SMU Meadows School of the Arts, has been named the Student Composer-in-Residence with the Irving Symphony Orchestra for its 2018-19 season.

Launched in 2011, the Student Composer-in-Residence program is a unique partnership between SMU Meadows and the Irving Symphony Orchestra (ISO). Each year, an undergraduate or graduate Meadows music composition student is selected to serve as a composer-in-residence with the orchestra and to create a commissioned work to be premiered by the ISO. It is the only known program of its kind between a professional orchestra and a university music department.

Jesse’s work, A Soldier’s Memory, will premiere at the ISO’s concert on November 3. It was commissioned to fit with the concert theme, “An Evening at the Movies and a Tribute to Veterans Day.”

“I come from a family of veterans, and with this opportunity I wanted to express my love and support for the military and contribute in my own way to my family’s military legacy,” said Jesse. “The work deals with different emotions and thoughts that returning soldiers have as they come home from deployment – from thoughts of heroism to the special moments of being reunited with their loved ones, and even moments of PTSD flashbacks. While there are aspects of celebration within the piece, overall I want to tell a more realistic story of a soldier’s journey. I couldn’t be more excited to be part of this concert!” 

An annual competition to select the student composer-in-residence is held by a committee composed of two members of the SMU composition faculty and ISO Music Director Hector Guzman, who earned a Master of Music in instrumental conducting at SMU in 1983. Faculty select three finalists who show the greatest potential, have demonstrated ability to score for orchestra, and have the maturity and work ethic to successfully complete the residency. Maestro Guzman then makes the final selection of the student he feels would be the best fit with the ISO’s repertoire and audience.

In addition to working closely with Maestro Guzman, Jesse will participate in ISO educational outreach programs and other orchestra activities as part of his residency.

“Being selected for this residency was an incredible honor, especially knowing the amount of talent and creativity in our composition department,” said Jesse. “I have learned so much under the tutelage of Dr. Robert Frank, the professor I’m working closely with on this project and my thesis. We share many of the same interests and his knowledge of many different film scoring techniques was able to help me grow within this piece and overall as a composer. I am very excited to be working with Maestro Guzman to learn more about the internal workings of an orchestra and to see how I can best contribute to a professional performing arts organization.” 

“Christian’s music has always shown a direct emotional connection with his audiences, and with his family background including a number of veterans, this project seemed ideally suited to his talents,” said Dr. Frank, associate professor of composition at SMU Meadows. “It is exciting to be able to give our top students real-world professional experience via this opportunity, one that few professional composers are ever able to have. Christian has creativity and skills along with the strong work ethic that point towards a successful career as a composer, and I am thrilled to be mentoring him.”  

Jesse will receive his M.M. in composition at Meadows in spring 2019. He earned a B.A. in music composition at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, where his awards included the 2016 Edna and Judson Loomis Prize in Music, and first place in the 2016 Wisconsin Alliance for Composers’ Student Composer Competition (undergraduate division) and the 2017 Spring University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh Concerto Competition for Composition. With a passion for writing in all mediums, he has composed works for various ensembles, musicians, video games and film. He continues to explore new sounds, techniques and genres as he works toward his dream career: composing for film and video games. 

Jesse is the sixth SMU student selected for the ISO Student Composer-in-Residence program. The first was Vince Gover, whose “Let Us Begin Anew…” (a quote from John F. Kennedy’s inaugural speech) premiered in November 2011 at an ISO concert honoring the 50th anniversary of Kennedy’s inauguration. Succeeding winners included Alvin Trotman, who premiered Jubilee in November 2012; Jesus J. Martinez, whose Harmonic Tremor was performed in February 2014; and Michael van der Sloot, whose work Cascade was presented in March 2016. Last year’s winner, Olga Amelkina-Vera, developed her award-winning guitar quartet piece Cattywampus Rompus (Texas Tarantella) into an orchestral work premiered by the ISO in April 2017.

The Irving Symphony Orchestra is a professional orchestra that provides signature performances for North Texas and regularly features renowned guest artists. Under the music direction of Maestro Guzman, it annually presents six concerts in its subscription season, four multi-media free youth concerts for more than 6,000 Irving middle school students, and free family, community and educational events. In addition to Jesse’s work, the November 3 concert will feature a Veteran’s Day celebration and music from such movie classics as Star Wars, The Magnificent Seven, The Patriot and more. For tickets and more information about the ISO’s 2018-19 season, visit www.irvingsymphony.com.

 

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SMU Meadows Dance Concert; photo by Paul Phillips
 
 

 

 

Program is Meadows’ first to showcase works exclusively by female choreographers,

and will feature two world premieres

 

Three exciting contemporary works, including premieres by Princess Grace Award recipient Bridget L. Moore and by Meadows Artist-in-Residence Brandi Coleman and a re-created work by New York-based choreographer Cherylyn Lavagnino, will be presented at SMU Meadows School of the Arts’ Fall Dance Concert, October 24-28 in the Bob Hope Theatre at SMU. The concert, titled “Celebrating Women’s Voices,” represents the first time Meadows has presented an entire show of works by female choreographers.

The program opens with Lavagnino’s Seize en Jeu, a work for 16 dancers set to the fourth movement of Franz Schubert’s Trio in E-flat Major. A re-creation of her 2013 work Treize en Jeu, it features additional dancers in duets, trios and solos set against a backdrop of counterpoint group entrances and exits, creating a textured picture that reflects the complex musical score. The work reflects Lavagnino’s mission to create movement that engages an audience by aligning the rigor of ballet with the humanistic performance values of contemporary dance. A former Pennsylvania Ballet soloist, Lavagnino has been a faculty member of NYU Tisch School of the Arts since 1987 and has led her own company, Cherylyn Lavagnino Dance, since 2000. She has created more than 40 works that have been performed both nationally and internationally.

The program continues with the premiere of Simply, Eartha by Dallas-based choreographer Bridget L. Moore, a work celebrating the life and legacy of singer/actress/dancer/activist Eartha Kitt. The six-part work reflects collective narratives conveyed through music and dance. Moore is the founder and artistic director of B. Moore Dance, and is known for creating works that provide both cultural and kinesthetic experiences rooted in African American and global dance aesthetics. She received both a 2012 Princess Grace Foundation Choreography Fellowship Award and a 2016 Princess Grace Professional Development grant for Arts Administration. She has received choreographic commissions from numerous companies, and her work has been presented at leading venues and festivals including Jacob’s Pillow, The Joyce Theater and the Ailey Citigroup Theater.

Concluding the program is Coleman’s upbeat new jazz work And One More Thing…, highlighting strength, resilience and an unwillingness to compromise as portrayed by a group of hard-hitting, unapologetic women. The piece is based in Jump Rhythm® Technique, a rhythm-generated, vocally supported approach to movement that focuses on percussive energy as a means of expressive dancing. Coleman is the associate artistic director of Jump Rhythm® Jazz Project (JRJP), an Emmy Award-winning performing and teaching company that celebrates the communal core of jazz performance: dancing, singing and storytelling in rhythmically syncopated bursts of energy. As an artist with JRJP since 2001, Coleman has both performed and led residencies and master classes at universities, companies and festivals across the country and internationally.

Fall Dance Concert performance times are 8 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday.  Tickets are $14 for adults, $11 for seniors and $8 for students, SMU faculty and staff.  The Bob Hope Theatre is located inside the Owen Arts Center, 6101 Bishop Blvd. on the SMU campus. For more information or to purchase tickets, call 214-768-2787 or click here.

-end-

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 by Nusaiba Mizan September 25, 2018                                                     
 
 
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2018 Arts Vibrancy Index Includes Nine New Cities

Cities Ranked by Per Capita Supply, Demand, and Government Support for the Arts

 

Dallas (SMU), July 12, 2018 – SMU’s National Center for Arts Research (NCAR) today released its fourth annual Arts Vibrancy Index, which ranks more than 900 communities across the country, examining the level of supply, demand, and government support for the arts in each city. This year, more than 20% of the communities on the most-vibrant list appear for the first time – a total of nine new communities, including four new states: Florida, Nebraska, Ohio and South Dakota.

“Arts vibrancy is dynamic, not static,” said Dr. Zannie Voss, director of NCAR. “New communities made the list, and there is some reshuffling among communities that made the list in previous years.”

Key movements and new communities featured on the lists include:

  • Traverse City, MI and Edwards, CO, which were ranked in 2016 but not in 2017,both reclaimed spots on the lists, in the top 10 medium and small communities, respectively;

  • Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, CA and Cleveland-Elyria, OH, are new to the index and are featured in the top-20, large metropolitan area list;

  • Omaha-Council Bluffs, NE-IA; Durham-Chapel Hill, NC; and Rapid City, SD, also new to the index, are featured in the top 10 medium cities list;

  • Hood River, OR; Durango, CO; Key West, FL; and Fredericksburg, TX, are making their debutin the top 10 small cities list.

Community rankings are organized into three distinct lists based on size: large (population over 1 million), medium (population between 100,000 and 1 million), and small (population under 100,000 with an urban core of 10,000-50,000).  The report complements each listed community’s scores with its story of what makes it unique and dynamic. For the complete lists and methodology, please visit the NCAR website. In addition to the Arts Vibrancy Index, NCAR provides scores for every U.S. county on its heat map, based on measures of arts dollars, arts providers, government support, and socio-economic and other leisure characteristics.

 “Arts and cultural organizations are well distributed across the country, serving communities both poor and affluent, rural and urban, not just on the coasts and not just in major metropolitan markets,” said Dr. Voss. “Between threats to eliminate federal arts funding, pushback from developers on percent-for-art requirements, and tax law changes that are expected to affect charitable giving, today’s climate of uncertainty makes it more important than ever to acknowledge and celebrate the essential role that arts and culture play in making communities throughout the country more vibrant places to live and visit. Creativity is a desirable and necessary element for an innovative and thriving community. Aside from being an engine of job creation and economic growth, arts and culture contribute to social well-being and are essential to creating more livable, safe, memorable and connected communities.”

 “The new Vibrancy Report once again demonstrates the dynamic power of the arts sector in America and how it ‘lives’ and thrives all over our vast nation,” said Karen Brooks Hopkins, NCAR’s Nasher Haemisegger Fellow. “The field continues to be under immense pressure for resources, but as the Vibrancy Report indicates, despite the challenges, arts programs and organizations are important tools in community revitalization.”

The overall index is composed of three dimensions examined on a per capita basis: supply, demand, and government support. Supply is assessed by the total number of arts providers in the community, including the number of arts and culture organizations and employees, independent artists, and entertainment firms. Demand is gauged by the total nonprofit arts dollars in the community, including program revenue, contributed revenue, total expenses, and total compensation. Lastly, the level of government support is based on state and federal arts dollars and grants.

Beyond the specific rankings, select findings in the Arts Vibrancy Index include:

 

 

  • Every region of the country is represented in the index: Arts vibrancy is not exclusive to large, coastal metropolitan areas – cities large and small from every region appear in the index. While large and medium metropolitan areas are represented in all regions of the country, the list of small communities is dominated by those located in western states – Alaska, Colorado, Idaho, Oregon, Utah and Wyoming.

  • Rankings of communities that have previously made the list are in constant flux: Many factors contribute to these shifts, including transformations in a city’s cultural scene (for example, through the opening of a large arts center) or changes in population size. In addition, Dr. Voss said, “We have learned a lot over the past two years about the role of distance, how concentration vs. dispersion of arts organizations and people factors in, and the extent to which a city’s cultural activity can attract or involve its neighboring communities. This has led us to make some adjustments to our analyses.”

  • Arts vibrancy takes many shapes and forms. Some communities have large, impressive nonprofit cultural institutions (e.g. Los Angeles, Washington, and Minneapolis), some have an abundance of smaller organizations and venues (e.g. Asheville, NC; Juneau, AK; and Austin, TX), while others are particularly attractive to artists (e.g. Jackson, WY, and Los Angeles) or to tourists (e.g. Summit Park, UT, and New Orleans). Some cities are robust and strong in a variety of arts sectors (e.g. New York and San Francisco), while others excel in one particular art form (Nashville). Some communities also received high levels of government support, including Rochester, NY, Pittsfield, MA, and Santa Fe.

  • Vibrancy in very large cities takes two distinct forms: Some cities feature a strong concentration of arts vibrancy in the urban core with less going on in the surrounding areas (e.g. Chicago and Philadelphia), while others feature vibrancy distributed evenly throughout the larger metropolitan area (e.g. Boston and Cambridge).

     

    The Lists

    The full lists, with detailed information on each community, are available on the NCAR website, including scores on each of the three metrics of vibrancy, i.e. level of arts providers (supply), arts dollars (demand), and government support for the arts.

     

    Large Cities

    Among cities with populations of 1 million or more, the five most vibrant arts communities are as follows:

  1. San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, CA

  2. New York-Jersey City-White Plains, NY-NJ

  3. Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV

  4. Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro-Franklin, TN

  5. Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI

     These were the top five large cities in 2017 as well; this year, San Francisco and Washington traded places, while the other three maintained their rankings. Two other cities joined the list for the first time: Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, CA, came in at #15, and Cleveland-Elyria, OH, ranked #19.

     

    Medium Cities

    Three communities with populations of 100,000 to 1 million are new to the Top 10 medium city list: Omaha-Council Bluffs, NE-IA; Durham-Chapel Hill, NC; and Rapid City, SD. They are ranked #6, #7 and #8, respectively. In addition, Traverse City, MI, which was included in 2016 but not 2017, returned to the list this year at #4. The top five list is as follows:

  1. Santa Fe, NM

  2. Pittsfield, MA

  3. San Rafael, CA

  4. Traverse City, MI

  5. Asheville, NC

     

    Small Cities

    For small communities, defined as areas with an urban core of 10,000-50,000 people, four cities are making their debut on the list: Hood River, OR; Durango, CO; Key West, FL; and Fredericksburg, TX. These new cities rank #4, #5, #6 and #10 in the Top 10 small communities list, respectively. The top five cities are:

  1. Edwards, CO

  2. Jackson, WY-ID

  3. Summit Park, UT

  4. Hood River, OR

  5. Durango, CO

     

About NCAR

In 2012, the Meadows School of the Arts and Cox School of Business at SMU launched the National Center for Arts Research (NCAR). The vision of NCAR is to act as a catalyst for the transformation and sustainability of the national arts and cultural community. The goals of the Center are to unlock insights on: 1) arts attendance and patronage; 2) understanding how managerial decisions, arts attendance, and patronage affect one another; and 3) fiscal trends and fiscal stability of the arts in the U.S., and to create an in-depth assessment of the industry that allows arts and cultural leaders to make more informed decisions and improve the health of their organizations. To work toward these goals, NCAR integrates data from DataArts and its Cultural Data Profile[1] and other national and government sources such as Theatre Communications Group, the League of American Orchestras, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Census Bureau, and the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies. NCAR makes its findings available free of charge to arts leaders, funders, policymakers, researchers, and the general public.

NCAR develops reports based on this uniquely comprehensive set of data that models the arts and culture ecosystem. It assesses the industry from multiple perspectives, including sector/art form, geography, and size of the organization, and it determines what drives health from the organization’s conditions and its community’s characteristics. Recent publications include white papers on ways to improve working capital health, dispelling the myth that the arts are elitist, and diversity and equity in the arts, as well as reports on the health of the U.S. arts and cultural sector. NCAR also offers the KIPI Dashboard, a free online diagnostic tool that allows arts organizations to benchmark their individual performance in nine finance and operations categories against their peers.

For more information, please visit the NCAR website at smu.edu/artsresearch.

 



[1] “DataArts is a nonprofit organization that empowers the arts and cultural sector with high-quality data and resources in order to strengthen its vitality, performance, and public impact. Any interpretation of the data is that of NCAR, not DataArts. For more information, visit www.culturaldata.org.”

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Meadows School of the Arts Presents Free Performances of You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown, May 31 and June 1 at 2 p.m.

 

Show is produced by “American Musical Theatre” MayTerm class in Margo Jones Theatre at SMU

 

The Meadows School of the Arts will present two performances of the musical You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown on May 31 and June 1 at 2 p.m. in the Margo Jones Theatre, located in the Owen Arts Center on the SMU campus. Admission is free; seating is first-come, first-served and limited to 125.

 

The show is the culmination of this year’s “American Musical Theatre” MayTerm class, in which music and theatre students produce a musical in less than three weeks. The shows are extremely popular – last year’s class presented The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee to packed audiences.

 

“SMU music, theatre and dance students are having great success being cast in musicals in companies in the Dallas area and across the country, and the course is helping to cultivate the skills necessary to be considered and cast in musicals,” said Professor of Voice Virginia Dupuy, who leads the class. She said it emphasizes dancing and acting skills as well as training in various singing techniques, including belting, for the musical stage. The show is directed by Associate Professor of Theatre Sara Romersberger, a veteran stage director and movement specialist, and is produced by Dupuy.

 

“We offer an immersive rehearsal experience, and we stress smart preparation because we only have ten rehearsal days from the first singing rehearsal until an audience sees the show. It’s an exciting opportunity for the students to produce a musical,” said Dupuy. Assisting her in production is Lane Harder, lecturer of music composition and theory and director of SYZYGY, the contemporary music ensemble of Meadows, and music director Chris Widomski (M.M. Performance/Organ ’11 and M.M. Conducting/Instrumental ’18), lecturer in music at The University of Texas at Dallas.

 

“The course addresses specific needs that our students have, with the eventual goal of them finding artistic success as well as employment as working musicians upon graduation,” says Harder. “Our students work very hard; it’s gratifying to see their very rapid progress.”

 

The show is presented without an intermission and lasts about 90 minutes. For more information, contact Lane Harder at lharder@smu.edu.

 

 
 
Lee Gleiser
Event Marketing Manager
SMU Meadows School of the Arts
 
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Deborah Cullinan
  

San Francisco-based initiative to develop a new investment model in Dallas to support artistic enterprises that help the community

 

DALLAS (SMU) May 22, 2018 -- The Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University has announced that its 2018 Meadows Prize will be awarded to CultureBank, a new, San Francisco-based initiative that will establish a new investment model in Dallas to provide support for artistic enterprises that help the community. Dallas is one of several cities in a larger CultureBank national pilot program. 

The $35,000 Meadows Prize is awarded to innovative artists and creative professionals and is a key aspect of the School’s Ignite/Arts Dallas program, which integrates artistic practices with community engagement in Dallas and across the country. 

Over the course of a year, CultureBank’s two founding partners, Penelope Douglas and Deborah Cullinan, will make regular trips to Dallas and, working with Ignite/Arts Director Clyde Valentín and local collaborators, will meet with foundations, venture capitalists and philanthropists to establish the new investment model. They also will be working to create a network of national and local experts and advisors to help structure and administer the Dallas model and to provide other kinds of non-monetary support for artistic enterprises and the community. In addition, they will look at potential artists’ enterprises to support, and plan to announce the first two local pilot investments in spring 2019. 

“CultureBank’s Meadows Prize residency will explore a new model for investing in the arts in Dallas,” said Valentín. “Their goal is to finance entrepreneurial artists whose work aims to serve a greater purpose. By investing in these artists, we hope to help them bring about meaningful change in Dallas communities. We will also be involving Meadows students in working with the selected artists across our curricular disciplines, from the performing arts and media to our focus on arts entrepreneurship.”

A key part of the CultureBank model is to create funds that are self-sustaining and will grow over time. Rather than distributing grants, the CultureBank fund in Dallas will provide myriad kinds of loans and investments. These could include low-interest or no-interest loans; taking an equity position in an arts organization’s business or assets; providing free business planning assistance or technical resources for a start-up; and more. CultureBank will structure investments differently in order to prioritize its core mission of increasing the value of cultural assets in communities and the capacity of artist enterprises to illuminate these assets. 

CultureBank was launched in 2016 as an initiative of San Francisco’s premier contemporary art center, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, and held a series of think tanks to develop its investment model, in which Valentín participated. The two founding partners are both passionate about the role artists play in social impact. Deborah Cullinan is CEO of Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, where she has launched bold new community programs, engagement strategies and civic coalitions. She is also on the board of the Community Arts Stabilization Trust and has served on the board of Mission Hub LLC, which launched the annual Social Capital Markets Conference in San Francisco, the world’s largest conference on impact investing and social enterprise. Penelope Douglas, a painter, has spent the past 25 years as a social entrepreneur, pioneer in community development investment, and co-founder and CEO of Pacific Community Ventures, a nonprofit that brings together small businesses, investors and policymakers to create jobs, strengthen local economies and stimulate public and private investment in underserved communities. She also served as chair of Mission Hub LLC and is currently on the board of directors of New Resource Bank, Startgrid, and Opportunity Finance Network. 

“CultureBank recognizes that there are assets of value in every community and that artist entrepreneurs are uniquely able to see and lift those assets,” said Douglas. 

“CultureBank seeks to develop this untapped ecosystem of artists by investing in their enterprises in order to develop undervalued community assets that pave the way for community health and well-being,” said Cullinan. 

Two kinds of artist-led enterprises will initially be considered for support. One category will be “place-based” investments to support endeavors in particular neighborhoods. The other will be “field of interest” investments related to larger issues such as mental health or food security.

The fund is also intended to support enterprises in different stages of growth. One might be a business that is in its early stages and, for example, needs technical assistance more than a loan; the other might be a more established business that needs a cash investment. 

“We are excited to help launch the CultureBank initiative in Dallas and form new partnerships to bring it to fruition, much as we did with Public Works Dallas in collaboration with Dallas Theater Center,” said Samuel Holland, dean of the Meadows School. “A key goal of the Meadows Prize is to support innovators in the arts who will have a positive impact on Dallas and integrate the Meadows School and its students more deeply into the community. By developing a sustainable source of support for area artistic enterprises, CultureBank has the potential to create a lasting legacy in the city that will benefit students, citizens and the artistic community for years to come.”

 

ABOUT CULTURE BANK

CultureBank is a new investment paradigm for the arts. Founded in partnership with Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, CultureBank invests in social impact artists who are developing undervalued community assets that contribute to community health and well-being. Drawing on the best attributes of community banks, social financiers, community development finance institutions, and placemaking organizations, CultureBank provides artists with capital from new and unexpected sources, changes the definition of ROI, and enables artists to create lasting social and economic change within communities. With a diverse group of stakeholders from the arts, civic impact and financial sectors, CultureBank is designing a radical investment model that is sustainable, adaptable, and replicable. For more information, visit http://culturebank.org.

 

ABOUT THE MEADOWS PRIZE

The Meadows Prize is presented every one to two years to innovative artists and projects in a discipline represented by one of the academic units within the Meadows School: advertising, art, art history, arts management and arts entrepreneurship, corporate communication and public affairs, creative computation, dance, film and media arts, journalism, music and theatre. The Prize includes support for a residency or program in Dallas, in addition to a $35,000 award. In return, recipients are expected to interact in a substantive way with Meadows students and collaborating arts organizations, and to leave a lasting cultural legacy in Dallas. 

The Meadows Prize is sponsored by the Meadows School and The Meadows Foundation. Previous winners of the Meadows Prize were Grammy-winning contemporary music ensemble eighth blackbird and New York-based public arts organization Creative Time (2010);playwright and performer Will Power and choreographer Shen Wei, artistic director of New York-based Shen Wei Dance Arts (2011); Tony-winning playwright and screenwriter Enda Walsh and choreographer Michael Keegan-Dolan, artistic director of Dublin-based Fabulous Beast Dance Theatre (2012); violist Nadia Sirota and socio-political artist Tania Bruguera (2013); choreographer and founder of Urban Bush Women Jawole Willa Jo Zollar (2014); the Detroit-based performance artist collective Complex Movements, and Lear deBessonet and The Public Theater’s Public Works program (2015); and southwest curatorial initiative New Cities, Future Ruins (2016).

 

ABOUT THE MEADOWS SCHOOL OF THE ARTS

The Meadows School of the Arts, formally established at SMU in 1969 and named in honor of benefactor Algur H. Meadows, is one of the foremost arts education institutions in the United States. The Meadows School offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in advertising, art, art history, arts management and arts entrepreneurship, corporate communication and public affairs, creative computation, dance, film and media arts, journalism, music and theatre. The goal of the Meadows School of the Arts, as a comprehensive educational institution, is to prepare students to meet the demands of professional careers. The Meadows School is a leader in developing innovative outreach and community engagement programs, challenging its students to make a difference locally and globally by developing connections between art, entrepreneurship and change. The school is also a convener for the arts in North Texas, serving as a catalyst for new collaborations and providing critical industry research. For more information, visit www.smu.edu/meadows.

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BEST-SELLING AUTHOR DIANA HENRIQUES PRESENTS “FROM BLACK MONDAY TO BERNIE MADOFF: LEGENDS AND LIES ON WALL STREET,”

THE 2018 O’NEIL LECTURE AT SMU, APRIL 17

 

Talk by award-winning financial journalist examines the “hubris and delusions” of the finance world

 

            Award-winning financial journalist and New York Times best-selling author Diana Henriques will deliver the 2018 William J. O’Neil Lecture in Business Journalism at SMU at 3:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 17. Henriques’ talk, “From Black Monday to Bernie Madoff: Legends and Lies on Wall Street,” examines the finance world’s hubris, romantic delusions, willful blindness and regulatory deficiencies. The lecture takes place in O’Donnell Hall, Room 2130 of the Owen Arts Center, 6101 Bishop Blvd. on the SMU campus. Admission is free, and tickets are not required. For further information call 214-768-3695. The O’Neil Lecture Series is presented by the Division of Journalism at SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts.

 

            Henriques is the author of A First-Class Catastrophe: The Road to Black Monday, the Worst Day in Wall Street History, a major new book about the 1987 stock market crash released in September 2017. She also wrote the New York Times bestseller The Wizard of Lies: Bernie Madoff and the Death of Trust, and starred as herself opposite Robert De Niro in the hit HBO movie based on the book. An avid reader and reviewer of financial histories, Henriques is also the author of The White Sharks of Wall Street: Thomas Mellon Evans and The Original Corporate Raiders (2000), Fidelity’s World: The Secret Life and Public Power of the Mutual Fund Giant (1995) and The Machinery of Greed: Public Authority Abuse and What To Do About It (1986). As a staff writer for The New York Times from 1989 to 2012 and as a contributing writer since then, she has largely specialized in investigative reporting on white-collar crime, market regulation and corporate governance.

 

Henriques was a member of a reporting team that was named a Pulitzer finalist in 2003 for its coverage of the aftermath of the Enron scandals. She was also a member of a team that won a 1999 Gerald Loeb Award for covering the near-collapse of Long Term Capital Management, a hedge fund whose troubles rocked the financial markets in September 1998. She was one of four reporters honored in 1996 by the Deadline Club, the New York City chapter of the Sigma Delta Chi professional journalism society, for a series on how wealthy Americans legally sidestep taxes. She has explored the expansion of tax breaks, regulatory exemptions and Congressional earmarks for religious nonprofits, and helped monitor commodity markets and money market funds in the financial turmoil of late 2008.

 

After the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, Henriques widened her focus to work with her colleague at The New York Times, David Barstow, in covering the management of billions of dollars in charity and victim assistance as part of the paper’s award-winning section, “A Nation Challenged.” She also chronicled the fate of Cantor Fitzgerald, the Wall Street firm that suffered the largest death toll in the World Trade Center attacks.

 

She says she is proudest of her 2004 series exposing the exploitation of American military personnel by financial service companies. Her work prompted legislative reform and cash reimbursements for tens of thousands of defrauded service members, drawing recognition and thanks from military lawyers and families across the country. For that series, she was a Pulitzer finalist in 2005 and received Long Island University’s George Polk Award; Harvard’s Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting; and the Nieman Foundation’s Worth Bingham Prize.

 

A native of Texas, Henriques is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of what is now the Elliott School of International Affairs at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. She has been a trustee of the university since 2011. She was awarded a Ferris professorship in writing at Princeton University for the 2012-13 academic year, and is a frequent guest lecturer for business journalism classes and workshops elsewhere. From 2003 to 2016, she served on the board of governors of the Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW). She and her husband live in Hoboken, N.J.

 

About the William J. O’Neil Lecture Series in Business Journalism

The William J. O’Neil Lecture Series in Business Journalism brings outstanding business journalism professionals to the SMU campus each semester. It is part of a cooperative program in financial reporting developed in 2007 by the Meadows School Division of Journalism and the Cox School of Business at SMU, through funding from William J. O’Neil, an SMU alumnus and chairman and CEO of Investor’s Business Daily.

 

The Division of Journalism, under Belo Distinguished Chair Tony Pederson, offers concentrations in all media – broadcast, print and internet – through its convergence journalism program. With the help of a gift from The Belo Foundation, the Division has become one of the few journalism schools in the country that provides hands-on experience through a high-definition television studio, digital newsroom and website.

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BEST-SELLING AUTHOR DIANA HENRIQUES PRESENTS “FROM BLACK MONDAY TO BERNIE MADOFF: LEGENDS AND LIES ON WALL STREET,”

THE 2018 O’NEIL LECTURE AT SMU, APRIL 17

 

Talk by award-winning financial journalist examines the “hubris and delusions” of the finance world

 

            Award-winning financial journalist and New York Times best-selling author Diana Henriques will deliver the 2018 William J. O’Neil Lecture in Business Journalism at SMU at 3:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 17. Henriques’ talk, “From Black Monday to Bernie Madoff: Legends and Lies on Wall Street,” examines the finance world’s hubris, romantic delusions, willful blindness and regulatory deficiencies. The lecture takes place in O’Donnell Hall, Room 2130 of the Owen Arts Center, 6101 Bishop Blvd. on the SMU campus. Admission is free, and tickets are not required. For further information call 214-768-3695. The O’Neil Lecture Series is presented by the Division of Journalism at SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts.

            Henriques is the author of A First-Class Catastrophe: The Road to Black Monday, the Worst Day in Wall Street History, a major new book about the 1987 stock market crash released in September 2017. She also wrote the New York Times bestseller The Wizard of Lies: Bernie Madoff and the Death of Trust, and starred as herself opposite Robert De Niro in the hit HBO movie based on the book. An avid reader and reviewer of financial histories, Henriques is also the author of The White Sharks of Wall Street: Thomas Mellon Evans and The Original Corporate Raiders (2000), Fidelity’s World: The Secret Life and Public Power of the Mutual Fund Giant (1995) and The Machinery of Greed: Public Authority Abuse and What To Do About It (1986). As a staff writer for The New York Times from 1989 to 2012 and as a contributing writer since then, she has largely specialized in investigative reporting on white-collar crime, market regulation and corporate governance.

Henriques was a member of a reporting team that was named a Pulitzer finalist in 2003 for its coverage of the aftermath of the Enron scandals. She was also a member of a team that won a 1999 Gerald Loeb Award for covering the near-collapse of Long Term Capital Management, a hedge fund whose troubles rocked the financial markets in September 1998. She was one of four reporters honored in 1996 by the Deadline Club, the New York City chapter of the Sigma Delta Chi professional journalism society, for a series on how wealthy Americans legally sidestep taxes. She has explored the expansion of tax breaks, regulatory exemptions and Congressional earmarks for religious nonprofits, and helped monitor commodity markets and money market funds in the financial turmoil of late 2008.

After the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, Henriques widened her focus to work with her colleague at The New York Times, David Barstow, in covering the management of billions of dollars in charity and victim assistance as part of the paper’s award-winning section, “A Nation Challenged.” She also chronicled the fate of Cantor Fitzgerald, the Wall Street firm that suffered the largest death toll in the World Trade Center attacks.

She says she is proudest of her 2004 series exposing the exploitation of American military personnel by financial service companies. Her work prompted legislative reform and cash reimbursements for tens of thousands of defrauded service members, drawing recognition and thanks from military lawyers and families across the country. For that series, she was a Pulitzer finalist in 2005 and received Long Island University’s George Polk Award; Harvard’s Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting; and the Nieman Foundation’s Worth Bingham Prize.

A native of Texas, Henriques is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of what is now the Elliott School of International Affairs at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. She has been a trustee of the university since 2011. She was awarded a Ferris professorship in writing at Princeton University for the 2012-13 academic year, and is a frequent guest lecturer for business journalism classes and workshops elsewhere. From 2003 to 2016, she served on the board of governors of the Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW). She and her husband live in Hoboken, N.J.

 

About the William J. O’Neil Lecture Series in Business Journalism

The William J. O’Neil Lecture Series in Business Journalism brings outstanding business journalism professionals to the SMU campus each semester. It is part of a cooperative program in financial reporting developed in 2007 by the Meadows School Division of Journalism and the Cox School of Business at SMU, through funding from William J. O’Neil, an SMU alumnus and chairman and CEO of Investor’s Business Daily.

The Division of Journalism, under Belo Distinguished Chair Tony Pederson, offers concentrations in all media – broadcast, print and internet – through its convergence journalism program. With the help of a gift from The Belo Foundation, the Division has become one of the few journalism schools in the country that provides hands-on experience through a high-definition television studio, digital newsroom and website.

Contact Info

SMU Meadows School of the Arts
32.8410948 -96.7861547
The Meadows School of the Arts, formally established in 1969 at SMU, is one of the foremost arts education institutions in the United States. The Meadows School comprises 11 academic disciplines: the Temerlin Advertising Institute, Art, Art History, Arts Management and Arts Entrepreneurship, Communication Studies, Creative Computation, Dance, Film and Media Arts, Journalism, Music and Theatre.

The goal of the Meadows School is to prepare students to meet the demands of professional careers. It is also committed to providing an ongoing opportunity for all SMU students to grow in the understanding and appreciation of the arts. The Meadows School is a leader in developing innovative outreach and community engagement programs, challenging its students to make a difference locally and globally by developing connections between art entrepreneurship and social change.
Address
6101 Bishop Blvd.
Dallas, TX 75205
Phone
214-768-2787 (Meadows ticket office)
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