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Charlotte Anderson

Charlotte Jones Anderson, Vice President of Marketing for the Dallas Cowboys, has made a difference for many people through her dedication to volunteer work, especially through her commitment to The Salvation Army.

Anderson got the Dallas Cowboys involved with The Salvation Army in the early 1990s. The Cowboys were looking to partner with a charity, and after meeting with The Salvation Army’s National Advisory Board Chair (the position that Anderson now holds), Anderson was sold on the agency’s work to serve others.

She immediately suggested that The Army use the Cowboys’ annual nationally- televised Thanksgiving Day game to produce a show that would launch The Salvation Army’s national Red Kettle Campaign during the holidays. For the past 15 years, this annual tradition has raised not only awareness about the needs of others who are less fortunate, but also about $1.6 billion.

“Choosing to be involved with The Salvation Army was an easy choice by the Dallas Cowboys Football Club and the Jones Family Charities,” Anderson said. “The organization keeps its promise to ‘do the most good’ without discrimination. They inspire me...they are humble stewards of other people's generosity.”

Nearly 30 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through the broadest array of social services that range from providing food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless and opportunities for underprivileged children.

Anderson said the Dallas Cowboys are excited to have Kenny Chesney perform at this year’s Thanksgiving halftime game on CBS. The Army is hoping to break last year's record of $147.6 million raised from the Red Kettle Campaign.

Anderson was named to the position of National Advisory Board Chair in May 2010 (the first female to hold the position), and attributes her parents for the priority she places on volunteer work and community service.  

“Both of my parents raised me to find our purpose in life," she said. "They taught us countless pearls of wisdom – one being, ‘to whom much is given, much is to be expected.’ Volunteering and helping those in need have always been an intangible benefit to my spirit.  I strive every day to be a great example to my children, which in turn honors and pays respect to what my parents gave to me.  I love the mission of The Salvation Army – ‘doing the most good’ – which summarizes my personal and professional aspiration.”