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Nicole Jacobsen
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The Episcopal School of Dallas is proud to be recognized by The Texas Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance as one of six “exemplary schools” in the Texas. More than 85 schools applied for this prestigious honor; ESD is also the only private school from Texas to receive for this recognition.

The Episcopal School of Dallas is proud to be recognized by The Texas Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance as one of six “exemplary schools” in the Texas. More than 85 schools applied for this prestigious honor; ESD is also the only private school from Texas to receive for this recognition.

The Lower School P.E. Program, led by Kris Brockhagen, helps students develop the knowledge, habits, and skills for healthy and active lifestyles. Working alongside Jenny Perez, Hollie Read, and Riqui Villareal, Brockhagen ensures students are learning in a safe environment that not only strengthens their gross and fine motor skills, but also focuses on self-discipline, teamwork, and lifetime wellness.

A special banner to honor the school and program will be presented in December at the TAHPERD State Conference in Galveston.

Nicole Jacobsen

Since the founding of the Rio Beni Health Project more than a decade ago, the organization has been working to deliver primary healthcare, educational lectures, training seminars to more than 60 villages over a 2,000-mile span.

Joselo Balderrama Hurtado, the Director of the Rio Beni Health Foundation in Bolivia, spent two days educating students at The Episcopal School of Dallas about the life-saving water filters he constructs and delivers to remote Amazonian communities.

“Our foundation builds these water filters because otherwise the people would be drinking brown, yellow, or orange water,” Balderrama explained. “Our filter systems make sure families can drink clean water that does not have any dirt in it.”

Balderrama explained to the Middle and Upper School students that working alongside volunteers from Students Shoulder-to-Shoulder (SStS) for the past three years has been invaluable to the organization’s success. The partnership not only allows the foundation to deliver nearly four times the number of filters in a shorter amount of time, but also provides resources to provide more filters for the indigenous people.

“When we have 15 American volunteers, we can deliver about 12 filters in three days,” Balderrama explained. “Normally it takes three people more than two weeks to deliver that many filters.”

Each filter weighs about 190 pounds and costs $27 to produce. However, once installed, the filters last for at least 25 years and can produce about 200 liters for a family every other week.

“Families find our organization and ask us to bring them filters,” Balderrama said. “The farthest I’ve traveled to deliver a filter was 10 hours. We have to carry the filter, load it on a boat, and then walk through the jungle to reach these communities. There are usually no paths or bridges to make it easier.”

Last year, Chloe Roberson ’16, spent two weeks in Bolivia working alongside Balderrama and other SStS volunteers to deliver and install the water filters.

“Attending Students Shoulder-to-Shoulder in Bolivia was an amazing, life-changing experience,” Roberson said. “Living with the people in the Gurdal community for three days was a challenge, but truly made me realize how grateful I am for the things I have – including something as simple as clean water. Joselo was a great leader, guide, and friend while living there. He and the rest of his staff gave us great advice and really helped us to adjust to the different environment to make our trip successful.”

During his visit with students at the Lower School, Balderrama talked about life in Bolivia, including the kind of food his family eats, as well as what resources the Amazon provides his community.

The third-grade students, who are in the middle of studying the different continents, had the opportunity to ask Balderrama about his family, where he went to school, and if he attended church on Sunday. Primer students asked him what kind of animals he saw living in the Amazon, as well as what the weather is usually like in South America.

“Joselo’s visit was exciting for the students and faculty who had a chance to meet with him,” Eleanor Arnold, ESD’s Director of Global Education, said. “His vision, his enthusiasm, and his commitment to his work were inspiring. We are proud that ESD, through our membership in the Students Shoulder-to-Shoulder Global Schools Coalition, has the privilege of working with people like Joselo.”

Nicole Jacobsen
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Joselo Visits ESD Joselo Balderrama Hurtado, the Director of the Rio Beni Health Foundation in Bolivia, spent two days educating students at The Episcopal School of Dallas about the life-saving water filters he constructs and delivers to remote Amazonian communities.

Since the founding of the Rio Beni Health Project more than a decade ago, the organization has been working to deliver primary healthcare, educational lectures, training seminars to more than 60 villages over a 2,000-mile span.

Joselo Balderrama Hurtado, the Director of the Rio Beni Health Foundation in Bolivia, spent two days educating students at The Episcopal School of Dallas about the life-saving water filters he constructs and delivers to remote Amazonian communities.

“Our foundation builds these water filters because otherwise the people would be drinking brown, yellow, or orange water,” Balderrama explained. “Our filter systems make sure families can drink clean water that does not have any dirt in it.”

Balderrama explained to the Middle and Upper School students that working alongside volunteers from Students Shoulder-to-Shoulder (SStS) for the past three years has been invaluable to the organization’s success. The partnership not only allows the foundation to deliver nearly four times the number of filters in a shorter amount of time, but also provides resources to provide more filters for the indigenous people.

“When we have 15 American volunteers, we can deliver about 12 filters in three days,” Balderrama explained. “Normally it takes three people more than two weeks to deliver that many filters.”

Each filter weighs about 190 pounds and costs $27 to produce. However, once installed, the filters last for at least 25 years and can produce about 200 liters for a family every other week.

“Families find our organization and ask us to bring them filters,” Balderrama said. “The farthest I’ve traveled to deliver a filter was 10 hours. We have to carry the filter, load it on a boat, and then walk through the jungle to reach these communities. There are usually no paths or bridges to make it easier.”

Last year, Chloe Roberson ’16, spent two weeks in Bolivia working alongside Balderrama and other SStS volunteers to deliver and install the water filters.

“Attending Students Shoulder-to-Shoulder in Bolivia was an amazing, life-changing experience,” Roberson said. “Living with the people in the Gurdal community for three days was a challenge, but truly made me realize how grateful I am for the things I have – including something as simple as clean water. Joselo was a great leader, guide, and friend while living there. He and the rest of his staff gave us great advice and really helped us to adjust to the different environment to make our trip successful.”

During his visit with students at the Lower School, Balderrama talked about life in Bolivia, including the kind of food his family eats, as well as what resources the Amazon provides his community.

The third-grade students, who are in the middle of studying the different continents, had the opportunity to ask Balderrama about his family, where he went to school, and if he attended church on Sunday. Primer students asked him what kind of animals he saw living in the Amazon, as well as what the weather is usually like in South America.

“Joselo’s visit was exciting for the students and faculty who had a chance to meet with him,” Eleanor Arnold, ESD’s Director of Global Education, said. “His vision, his enthusiasm, and his commitment to his work were inspiring. We are proud that ESD, through our membership in the Students Shoulder-to-Shoulder Global Schools Coalition, has the privilege of working with people like Joselo.”

Nicole Jacobsen
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Five ballerinas sashay across a wood floor as The Episcopal School of Dallas’ new dance teacher, Glen Dawson, claps out a series of eight-counts from the corner. Wearing pink tutus and worn-in pointe shoes and slippers, the students are the epitome of grace, poise, and strength.

Students need no prior dance experience to enroll in a class. Rather, Dawson works with students at their individual skill level, while still choreographing routines that compliment all degrees of difficulty and style.

“I try to keep classes open, but I allow those with more experience to take on a leadership role and help their peers,” Dawson explains. “The ultimate goal is to push everyone to be better, while still working to develop a strong foundation and excellent technique.”

The new curriculum provides students with basic classical training, as well as historical overview of different styles. Dawson places an emphasis on ballet, but also incorporates jazz and contemporary.

“Being able to take dance at ESD is a great opportunity for me to try something new in school,” Claire Everbach ’21 says. “It gives my friends who don’t dance outside of school the chance to try different styles and work with a really fun teacher.”

Right now, only girls are enrolled in the courses, but Dawson hopes to one day expand the program to include boys, including student-athletes. Most recently, she organized the fifth-grade “Thriller flash mob to show that dance courses are not just for girls.

“Ms. Dawson has created a strong foundation in her classes for students to build upon, while preventing those with less experience to be intimidated by their peers,” Libby Conder, Assistant Head of Middle School, says. “Students can learn and excel at their own pace in a safe and non-competitive environment.”

In addition to the physical benefits associated with dance, Donna Wilson, Ph.D., the developer of the Masters and Ed.S. Degree Program in Brain-Based Teaching, confirms, “incorporating exercise and movement throughout the school day makes students less fidgety and more focused on learning.” Furthermore, Edutopia asserts that exercise also facilitates a student’s brain readiness and ability to learn and retain information. Activities that involve multiple senses, such as dance, also make learning more memorable.

Upper School students also have the opportunity to earn Fine Arts and Physical Education credits by participating in classes before the school day begins. In their first performance of the year, Elizabeth Lipscomb ’17Zoe Long ’16, and Bailey Parsons ’17 danced to “Amazing Grace” during a Middle School chapel service.

“These girls are starting to do their own choreography, and in November will perform pieces in the Jennifer & John Eagle Gallery in front of a piece of artwork they selected,” Dawson says. “Having the opportunity to create their own piece really gives them a feeling of self-worth and lets them present their feelings in an artistic sense.”

Dusty Davidson, the Fine Arts Department Chair, believes dance has filled a void in the Fine Arts curriculum, and better aligns the department with peer schools.

“By adding another component of artistic expression, our students gain the ability to look at the world from a different perspective,” Davidson explains. “Our dancers will become more flexible, focused, and toned, while improving their self-confidence and self-discipline.”

Dawson, who received her BFA in Dance and Theater from the University of Texas, and MFA in Dance from SMU, owned and danced in Austin Repertory Dancers. She also danced in summer musicals for Austin Zilker Musicals and performed with Austin Ballet Theater. She taught at McCallum Performing Arts High School in Austin where she developed the dance curriculum and dance program for the school and for Austin I.S.D. She has served as an adjunct professor at several local colleges and taught dance and yoga at local studios.

“I’ve been dancing since I was five,” Dawson says. “I started teaching because working with kids is such a joy. They are such sponges, and if you can watch them early enough to where they aren’t overwhelmed, they just might stick with dance.”

Nicole Jacobsen
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Students in Ellen Neill’s fifth-grade science classes at The Episcopal School of Dallas have been studying physics concepts, and how the laws of motion propel a marble along a roller coaster track.

Marbles rolled across the floor as students scrambled to secure connections and fine-tune turns.

For the past few days, students in Ellen Neill’s fifth-grade science classes at The Episcopal School of Dallas have been studying physics concepts, and how the laws of motion propel a marble along a roller coaster track. 

“It’s really neat to see the marble gain speed and complete a loop, but then slow down when it’s just moving straight along a track,” Emily Lichty explained. “I never knew it this all had to do with force, acceleration, and velocity.”

After understanding the differences between net force, gravity, and friction, as well as how an object gains and loses speed, students were given the task of designing roller coaster tracks that successfully hold a rolling marble from start to finish.

For the first challenge, the marbles had to clear three hills and single loop-the-loop without falling off. The second challenge asked students to design a track that changed levels at least five times, made a U-turn, and came to rest at a tissue barricade without tearing the paper.

Neill said the level changes could include ramps, drops, or valleys. Students could also use tape to secure lengths of Styrofoam piping, and attach their tracks to any objects in the classroom, including tables, paper towel dispensers, chairs, and filing cabinets.

“They needed to figure out how to move the marble up a hill and make sharp turns without pushing it along,” Neill said. “It’s been great seeing them use their creative-thinking skills and scientific knowledge to excel at the different challenges.”

For the final challenge, students had to build a roller coaster with one large and one small hill, an S-turn or loop-the-loop, and track space for the marble to hit and topple over a paper cup.

Points were awarded for each obstacle the marble cleared. Students also had to record the run time of each challenge to measure the marble’s acceleration.

“The hardest part was trying to make the marble stop without ripping the paper,” Luke Mooty said. “My team was stuck on the second challenge for awhile, but after we added more track we were able to slow down the marble’s acceleration. I knew we would figure it out, but once that marble got moving, it was hard to slow down.”

Click here to see more photos.

Nicole Jacobsen
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Victoria Siu, a senior at The Episcopal School of Dallas, led a self-defense class for women at the Genesis Women’s Shelter as part of her service-learning project. Siu not only taught the class, but also worked with the organization to coordinate a date, time, and location for the class, and learn what kind of course would be most beneficial to the women.

“I wanted to do something that would positively impact the women and make them more confident,” Siu said. “It was inspiring to give these women the ability to fight, and it’s definitely something I want to continue doing in college and beyond.”

Several of the women who attended Siu’s class told her afterwards they feel safer walking to and from the bus stop. Others said it was very helpful to receive the training from another female, rather than a male Dallas Police Officer. 

"I will never be able to explain what a difference Victoria made in the lives of the women who have known danger and fear for so long,” Elizabeth Wheller, a case manager at Genesis Women’s Shelter said. “Her class gave them a priceless gift of freedom, safety, and knowledge."

Siu, who started taking karate classes at age 8 and earned a black belt last year, says she became involved in the sport to learn self-defense.

“I felt that my experience in karate and being a young woman made me more relatable,” Siu explained. “I just want these women to be educated and feel that they could defend themselves if they ever needed to.”

Nicole Jacobsen

Friday mornings in the Lower School Dining Commons at The Episcopal School of Dallas are full of excitement; rooks can often be heard rolling across the floor as students push back from tables to scramble across the tiles to record their latest victory. Little black boxes are smacked with excitement each time a move is completed. Cheers frequently erupt as students gather around in groups to encourage their peers. There’s plenty of friendly competition at the Lower School Chess Club meetings, but the meetings are two-fold.

“Chess Club not only allows students to learn the strategy of the game, but the mornings also provides the social interaction between their peers in other grade levels,” Zora Skelton, the club’s sponsor, explained. “Throughout the year, you see first graders gain the courage to challenge a third grader, and the interactions teach them how to accept a win and manage a loss.”

At one end of the Dining Commons stands a leaderboard that records the standing of each participant. To advance up the ladder, a student has to defeat a higher-ranked opponent. Each colored ladder represents a different level of difficulty the students must navigate through during the year to reach the most challenging rings.

“Everyone’s trying to beat the person at the top of the blue ladder, but he’s so good that it’s really hard to win against him,” second-grader James Altizer said. “Before I leave the Lower School my goal is to beat everyone.” 

At the start of the morning, students grab a chessboard, game pieces, and a partner to squeeze a few games in with before the lessons begin. About halfway through the morning, Hermanio Baez and Paco Gomez divide the students into groups to teach them new strategies and tactics.

Gomez, who currently serves as the group’s parent liaison, has been a valuable member of the club for years.

“Chess is a fantastic game that can benefit every child. The game helps develop thinking skills, such as the ability to visualize, analyze, and think critically,” Gomez explained. “Chess Club brings together children of different ages and genders in an activity they all enjoy, while also teaching them about sportsmanship, how to win graciously, and not to give up when encountering defeat.”

Started 13 years ago by Kaitlin Smith ’13, the club has grown to as many as 60 students on any given Friday. With lessons tailored for every skill level, students of all abilities are encouraged to attend a game.

“When the club started, we had between five and eight students,” Skelton said. “Since that first year, lessons are provided at each level and students are encouraged to play chess regardless of whether they win or lose. Many students choose to participate in weekend chess tournaments for additional exposure and competition.”

Several students say that learning how to play chess has also helped them become more studious and disciplined in the classroom. Through the lessons they learn from Mr. Baez and Mr. Gomez, participants say they have improved their memory and concentration, and can focus better on assignments.

“Chess helps me do better on my homework because I can stay focused and pay attention to what is in front of me,” Edwin Bishop, a fifth-grade student said.

Parents are also invited to attend the Friday morning meetings and challenge their son or daughter to a game, or offer advice to an entire table as they face-off against another parent. For some, just watching the students yell “checkmate” or move their picture up on the ladder is rewarding enough.

“My favorite memory of Chess Club is ongoing,” Skelton said. “No matter how tired and worn out I am, coming in on a Friday morning before 7:00 a.m. and finding one or two students waiting for me in the Dining Commons waiting to play chess… How can anyone not love Chess Club?”

 

On November 15, The Episcopal School of Dallas will host the second annual "Fit for a King" chess tournament on the Merrell Road Campus. Students of all ages and grade levels are encouraged to participate in the competition. Visit www.esdallas.org/chess for more information and to register your student today!

Nicole Jacobsen
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ESD Chess Club On November 15, The Episcopal School of Dallas will host the second annual "Fit for a King" chess tournament on the Merrell Road Campus. Students of all ages and grade levels are encouraged to participate in the competition. Visit www.esdallas.org/chess for more information and to register your student today!

Friday mornings in the Lower School Dining Commons at The Episcopal School of Dallas are full of excitement; rooks can often be heard rolling across the floor as students push back from tables to scramble across the tiles to record their latest victory. Little black boxes are smacked with excitement each time a move is completed. Cheers frequently erupt as students gather around in groups to encourage their peers. There’s plenty of friendly competition at the Lower School Chess Club meetings, but the meetings are two-fold.

“Chess Club not only allows students to learn the strategy of the game, but the mornings also provides the social interaction between their peers in other grade levels,” Zora Skelton, the club’s sponsor, explained. “Throughout the year, you see first graders gain the courage to challenge a third grader, and the interactions teach them how to accept a win and manage a loss.”

At one end of the Dining Commons stands a leaderboard that records the standing of each participant. To advance up the ladder, a student has to defeat a higher-ranked opponent. Each colored ladder represents a different level of difficulty the students must navigate through during the year to reach the most challenging rings.

“Everyone’s trying to beat the person at the top of the blue ladder, but he’s so good that it’s really hard to win against him,” second-grader James Altizer said. “Before I leave the Lower School my goal is to beat everyone.” 

At the start of the morning, students grab a chessboard, game pieces, and a partner to squeeze a few games in with before the lessons begin. About halfway through the morning, Hermanio Baez and Paco Gomez divide the students into groups to teach them new strategies and tactics.

Gomez, who currently serves as the group’s parent liaison, has been a valuable member of the club for years. He is also responsible for organizing ESD’s “Fit for a King” tournament every fall. (See sidebar for more information).

“Chess is a fantastic game that can benefit every child. The game helps develop thinking skills, such as the ability to visualize, analyze, and think critically,” Gomez explained. “Chess Club brings together children of different ages and genders in an activity they all enjoy, while also teaching them about sportsmanship, how to win graciously, and not to give up when encountering defeat.”

Started 13 years ago by Kaitlin Smith ’13, the club has grown to as many as 60 students on any given Friday. With lessons tailored for every skill level, students of all abilities are encouraged to attend a game.

“When the club started, we had between five and eight students,” Skelton said. “Since that first year, lessons are provided at each level and students are encouraged to play chess regardless of whether they win or lose. Many students choose to participate in weekend chess tournaments for additional exposure and competition.”

Several students say that learning how to play chess has also helped them become more studious and disciplined in the classroom. Through the lessons they learn from Mr. Baez and Mr. Gomez, participants say they have improved their memory and concentration, and can focus better on assignments.

“Chess helps me do better on my homework because I can stay focused and pay attention to what is in front of me,” Edwin Bishop, a fifth-grade student said.

Parents are also invited to attend the Friday morning meetings and challenge their son or daughter to a game, or offer advice to an entire table as they face-off against another parent. For some, just watching the students yell “checkmate” or move their picture up on the ladder is rewarding enough.

“My favorite memory of Chess Club is ongoing,” Skelton said. “No matter how tired and worn out I am, coming in on a Friday morning before 7:00 a.m. and finding one or two students waiting for me in the Dining Commons waiting to play chess… How can anyone not love Chess Club?”

 

On November 15, The Episcopal School of Dallas will host the second annual "Fit for a King" chess tournament on the Merrell Road Campus. Students of all ages and grade levels are encouraged to participate in the competition. Visit www.esdallas.org/chess for more information and to register your student today!

Nicole Jacobsen
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New Learning Spaces at The Episcopal School of Dal Different stations throughout the gated area allow children to not only choose from a variety of activities, but also to develop new skills without recognizing they are actively learning. Furthermore, the cross-disciplinary work of combining science and exploration allows for more creative thinking and problem-solving, as well as collaboration between students.

United in the conviction that environment is our children’s third teacher, we can begin a new vital mission: designing today’s schools for tomorrow’s world. The Third Teacher

The new school year at The Episcopal School of Dallas brings new beginnings: new friends, a new curriculum, and new learning spaces. Students at the Lower School of The Episcopal School of Dallas were welcomed with a new outdoor exploration area, a fine motor skills lab, and redesigned learning spaces.

Susan Fraser, an education professor at Clark University explained, “A classroom that is functioning successfully as the third teacher will be responsive to the children's interests, provide opportunities for children to make their thinking visible, and then foster further learning and engagement."  

With this concept in mind, Lower School faculty and staff spent the last year researching how to utilize a student’s natural environment as a third teacher.

“Parents have long been considered a child's first teacher, with the classroom teacher at a close second. Research supports that learning environments are the ‘third teacher,’ leading to significant innovation in all aspects of the classroom atmosphere from furniture design to layout,” Chelle Wabrek, Assistant Head of Lower School said. “Classrooms need to provide spaces for children to collaborate, to concentrate, and to decompress, as well as the versatility to allow teachers to modify their space in response to student learning.”

The new learning spaces came to fruition last fall, during a visit from educator and designer, Christian Long of Wonder By Design. Long spent a day with Lower School teachers brainstorming new learning environments for students. But rather than let teachers use nouns to describe what they wanted, Long asked them to list verbs specific to what could be done in the new space. Ideas such as “conduct scientific explorations,” “grow plants,” and “make a mess” were tossed around as potential uses for the new spaces.

Included in the new outdoor exploration area are water tables with hand cranks, building block stations, sand boxes with measuring cups, and painting easels. New developments also include tables with connecting pipes and a water table with submerged letters and numbers that students must “fish” out. There are also picnic tables that double as benches to provide students and teachers will space for concentration, as well as an area that students can share a meal.

Different stations throughout the gated area allow children to not only choose from a variety of activities, but also to develop new skills without recognizing they are actively learning. Furthermore, the cross-disciplinary work of combining science and exploration allows for more creative thinking and problem-solving, as well as collaboration between students.

“Research shows that a program rich in creative play and exploration enhances the development of the whole child,” Jill Stanford, a Pre-K teacher at ESD, explained. “The whole area has been an incredible addition to the Pre-K curriculum.”

Also new to the Lower School environment is a Motor Skills Lab. Donated in part by the ESD Booster Club, this new space allows children to build the gross and fine motor muscles crucial to sustained development. Young children develop the muscle capability to control and support their weight by swinging on trapeze bars, climbing jungle gyms, and bouncing on trampolines. Students also learn how to skillfully balance and walk on narrow rows of blocks, and engage in activities that test their hand-eye coordination.

"The connection between physical development and brain development is well known and it is exciting to watch our Physical Education department work in concert with our early childhood educators to encourage both gross and fine motor muscles," Wabrek said.

New classroom designs for second-grade students also emerged during the brainstorm sessions with Long. New to this year’s rooms are Idea Paint walls that students can write on with dry erase markers, wobble chairs, and moveable desks and tables.

The classrooms also include tables designed for quick and easy storage so when teachers need to create large workspaces for collaboration, science experiments, space can be made readily available. Ergonomically engineered chairs and stools ensure a child’s natural instinct to move is not curbed, but rather used as a vehicle for better learning. According to research by Dr. Mark Rapport, the supervisor of the study and professor of psychology at the University of Central Florida, children need to move in order to better focus during complicated mental tasks.

“Second-grade teachers began this school year with spaces that are flexible and maximize student learning.  Idea Paint on the walls creates shared work space to students to work through math challenges together or to brainstorm story ideas,” Wabrek said. “It is clear that these second-grade learning spaces have been ‘decorated,’ but have been designed to better maximize brain power.”

For a tour of these spaces and to learn more about The Episcopal School of Dallas Lower School community, please attend one of our upcoming Admission Previews on October 16 and 21, and November 13.

Learn more at www.esdallas.org/admissionevents. To see more photos of the new learning spaces, please click here.

Nicole Jacobsen
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The Perot Museum of Nature and Science was bubbling over with energy and excitement as students from The Episcopal School of Dallas and St. Philip’s School and Community Center teamed up for the 2theXtreme: MathAlive! exhibit’s Xtreme Math Match. Each team was comprised of three fifth-grade students from the two schools, as well as scorekeepers, and official spokespeople.

Prior to the contest, each student was paired up with a meteorologist from one of the Dallas-area news stations, including Evan Andrews (Fox 4), Colleen Coyle (WFAA), David Finfrock (NBC 5), Jeff Jamison (CBS 11), Milmar Ramirez (Univision), and Kevin Roth (CW 33). Representing ESD from the Class of 2022 was Mary Grace Altizer, Connor Awbrey, Evin Bishop, Paco Gomez- Quinonez, Jackson Lutz, and Dalia Nabulsi.

“Students answered questions like, "A weather balloon is ten feet off the ground and is rising at a constant rate of two feet per second.  What is its height after three minutes?"  It was exciting to celebrate math together,” Chelle Wabrek, Assistant Head of Lower School, said.

As the Radical! Rockets and Xtreme! Snowboarders hurriedly scrambled to answer their assigned questions, fourth and fifth graders from both schools cheered their peers on in front of several museum patrons, families, and media outlets.

“I was really nervous to be up on a big stage, but it was really awesome getting to work with Mrs. Coyle to win the contest,” Nabulsi said.

“Some of the questions were kind of hard, but it was really fun to still compete with my friends and amongst the students from St. Philip’s,” Bishop said.

After the contest, the students headed downstairs to experience the MathAlive! exhibit. More than 100 students packed the 5,000 square-foot exhibit as they explored the six themed areas dedicated to STEM research and learning.

“The 2theXtreme: MathAlive! exhibit at the Perot Museum demonstrates everything that we as educators believe – everyone wants to and can do math,” Head of School, Meredyth Cole, said. “The hands-on experiments and activities make math accessible, fun, and above all, relevant to students of all ages. Through sports, robotics, fashion design, video games, music-making, and more, students of all ages can be awakened and inspired to the limitless possibilities math has to offer.”

The exhibition runs until January 4, 2015.